Technology

Today, British police said they arrested a 19-year-old man in connection with distributed denial of service attacks on, among other sites, the U.S. Senate and the CIA. Police said Ryan Clearly was linked to the hacker activist group LulzSec.

The Guardian reports:

Investigators believe the arrest is significant and linked to the attacks based mainly at websites belonging to US institutions and organisations.

You can hear Laura Sydell, NPR's Digital Culture Reporter, talk to All Things Considered's Melissa Block about the announcement by clicking on the audio link above.

On Monday afternoon, Apple announced the introduction of iCloud, a music service that will allow users to listen to their music from almost any Internet-connected device. (Update at 4:30 p.m.: Initially we called Apple's service a streaming one. We're not sure exactly how iTunes Match will work, and we're getting in touch with Apple. We'll update again as soon as we hear back.)

Facebook was created for college students to get in touch with each other. It has helped people stay in touch online so well, that it might be hurting attendance at real-world class reunions.

Now that it's been confirmed that Microsoft is buying Skype for $8.5 billion, a couple questions arise:

Where does Skype fit into Microsoft's plans?

And will Microsoft succeed where Skype hasn't so far — by making money from the Internet telephone service? Or is that not the point?

A few earlier analyses:

Terry Button is a fifth-generation farmer from upstate New York who also works as a long-distance trucker, hauling hay and produce up and down the East Coast.

He's proud of his truck and likes it just the way it is. Inside, the cab is homey and low-tech, with a bed behind the two seats and a CB radio. There's no cruise control and no GPS telling him where to go.

I'm pretty sure my internist isn't on Twitter. And I think it's better that way. I really do.

When I take a look at what some doctors tweet I get a little worried. Would they describe my visit, sometimes explicitly, in 140 characters?

Late last year, activists attacked websites belonging to companies that refused to do business with WikiLeaks, an online group that has disclosed classified U.S. government documents.

When the activists, who called themselves Anonymous, found out they were being investigated by the Internet security company HBGary Federal, the group hacked the company's servers and stole thousands of private e-mails. And then it dumped them onto the Internet.

It was an embarrassment for the security company to get hacked — but the content of some of those e-mails is raising concerns.

There two big tech stories today:

First, in conjunction with Apple, News Corp. founder Rupert Murdoch launched a news app called The Daily that publishes exclusively on the iPad.

"New times demand new journalism," Murdoch said to reporters at Manhattan's Guggenheim Museum. "Our challenge was to take the best of traditional journalism — competitive shoe-leather reporting, good editing, a skeptical eye and combine it with the best of contemporary technology."

First it's the GPS router of doom, now the robots are just going to be driving the cars?

The New York Times had a piece over the weekend that outlined yet another Google-cum-robot plan for world domination. Robot cars. No, really, I'm serious.

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