Technology

An online controversy over a South Korean voice actress's tweeted image of a T-shirt has escalated into what is now being called East Asia's version of Gamergate — a reference to the vitriolic controversy that pitted gamers, largely men, against women in tech.

A group of nano-scientists has discovered a way to arrange individual atoms to store and rewrite data 500 times more efficiently than the best hard drives on the market.

Dead men tell no tales, but their phones might.

Early last month, two detectives walked into the lab of Anil Jain, a professor of computer science and engineering at Michigan State University. They had heard of Jain's cutting-edge work in fingerprint recognition and wanted his help in a murder investigation.

The auto industry is watching to see whether Tesla, which has its roots in the tech world of Silicon Valley, can pull off its goal of mass producing cars.

The goal hit a road bump in May when Tesla had its first fatality in a vehicle using Autopilot, a feature it offers that allows the car to do a lot of the driving.

It's supposed to be an assist. Before you engage it, it warns you not to take your hands off the wheel.

Verizon is buying Yahoo for $4.8 billion, acquiring its "core Internet assets" — search, email, finance, news, sports, Tumblr, Flickr — in essence writing the final chapter of one of the longest-running Internet companies.

At the outset, the Internet was expected to be an open, democratic source of information. But algorithms, like the kind used by Facebook, instead often steer us toward articles that reflect our own ideological preferences, and search results usually echo what we already know and like.

Lately, it has felt like the terrible news just won't stop. As soon as you've wrapped your head around one story, you're pummeled by another — and then another.

The VCR is officially going the way of the Betamax and LaserDisc: into the technology graveyard.

This week, actress and comedian Leslie Jones quit Twitter after receiving a barrage of targeted racist, sexist and otherwise abusive messages following the release of the all-female remake of Ghostbusters.

The thing about the tech industry and employee diversity reports is they can feel like Groundhog Day:

  • Google, 2014: "Put simply, Google is not where we want to be when it comes to diversity."
  • Google, 2016: "We saw encouraging signs of progress in 2015, but we're still far from where we need to be."

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