Technology

At the outset, the Internet was expected to be an open, democratic source of information. But algorithms, like the kind used by Facebook, instead often steer us toward articles that reflect our own ideological preferences, and search results usually echo what we already know and like.

Lately, it has felt like the terrible news just won't stop. As soon as you've wrapped your head around one story, you're pummeled by another — and then another.

The VCR is officially going the way of the Betamax and LaserDisc: into the technology graveyard.

This week, actress and comedian Leslie Jones quit Twitter after receiving a barrage of targeted racist, sexist and otherwise abusive messages following the release of the all-female remake of Ghostbusters.

The thing about the tech industry and employee diversity reports is they can feel like Groundhog Day:

  • Google, 2014: "Put simply, Google is not where we want to be when it comes to diversity."
  • Google, 2016: "We saw encouraging signs of progress in 2015, but we're still far from where we need to be."

It's only been out a week, but Pokémon Go is making more money than a Meowth using Pay Day.

Our world shares today much of what would be inaccessible if not for our unprecedented interconnectedness. We share car rides using smartphone apps. We share our spare rooms with strangers who don't simply want to be tourists in a new city. We share videos and photos of our good times and our bad — especially when our bad times include violent images and photos of people being attacked or killed.

When Julian Castro assumed the post of Housing and Urban Development secretary in 2014, the U.S. government already had a few programs aimed at expanding Americans' access to the Internet. It's the sort of thing that is paramount to success in the modern economy, long advocated by President Obama and other government officials.

Jeremy Bernfeld / Harvest Public Media

Food companies and farm groups were the victors Thursday with the passage of a federal bill establishing standards for the disclosure of genetically-modified ingredients in food products.

In a 306-117 vote, the U.S. House approved a bill that supersedes a much stricter law that went into effect in Vermont on July 1. The measure, pushed through the Senate last week, is expected to be signed by President Obama.

The director of the National Security Agency says his first few dedicated cyber troops will be operational by early fall but the nation can't wait for the full unit to be ready.

The military's Cyber Mission Force, which will eventually contain 6,200 people split into 133 teams, is the largest single unit dedicated to operating in computer networks. It's intended to both attack and defend computer systems around the world.

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