Technology

In a basement office at Purdue University in Indiana, associate professor of engineering practice Brad Duerstock has designed a special space.

The message from Google's developers' conference is clear: The company is prepared to take on competitors as well as regulators.

CEO Sundar Pichai and his team were flexing. Big time.

Through a litany of product announcements at the so-called I/O annual conference in Mountain View, Calif. — messaging apps, a personal virtual assistant and a voice-controlled speaker that connects you with it -- the company basically said:

When someone tags you in a photo on Facebook, it's often a nice reminder of a shared memory. It lets your whole social network see what you've been up to or where you've been.

Well, to three men from Illinois, this feature takes on a much more sinister capacity. They argue that when someone tags you in a photo on Facebook without your consent, Facebook is breaking the law — and a federal judge has allowed the case to proceed.

Looking at art is the core museum experience. I remember, when I was a kid, seeing Van Gogh's Starry Night for the first time. I stood for what seemed like hours, staring at the thick paint and swirling colors in a quiet gallery at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Before there was Star Wars' C-3PO and the robot who famously warned of "Danger, Will Robinson!" on TV's Lost in Space, there was Eric — one of the world's first real robots. He was built in 1928, less than a decade after the word "robot" was first used.

An unlikely class of college graduates will walk the stage on Saturday. They're the product of intensive three-year bachelor's degree program in computer science called CSin3. We first told you about it when it launched three years ago.

Blondinrikard Fröberg / Flickr - Creative Commons

A couple of Sundays ago, New York Times critics Manohla Dargis and A.O. Scott, wrote about drastic changes in how we watch movies. What set them off is the move to internet streaming in place of discs, and in particular they worried about a plan to stream just-released movies to people directly, so that they can pay $50 to watch a new film at home instead of sitting in a movie house. Dargis and Scott talked about many of the usual questions. Seeing a movie at home on a small screen – even if it's a big television – is less affecting than seeing it in a theater; at home alone is also a lot different from seeing it in a room full of strangers because movies lose their public-ness.

There are a couple of things they didn't get to, though.

A few weekends ago, Texas entrepreneur Regina Vatterott stood in front of 50 people on the top floor of a startup hub in Austin. She was there to pitch her smart pillbox company, EllieGrid, to a panel of six judges.

Doctors' scrawls on prescription pads and medical folders are so analog.

These days, they're prescribing and keeping track of patients' records using digital devices connected to wireless networks, sometimes remotely. More medical devices are also becoming increasingly small and wearable; they often connect with a hand-held controller or even your smartphone through Bluetooth or Wi-Fi, sometimes sending the data directly to physicians.

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