U.S. Fish and Wildlife (USFWS)

A new report from Congress’s watchdog says employees overseeing public lands are facing hundreds of threats and assaults.

 


John and Karen Hollingsworth / USFWS

Scientists tasked with reviewing government plans to lift protections for gray wolves across most of the U.S. said in a report released Friday that the proposal has numerous factual errors and other problems.

The five-member scientific panel's conclusions were detailed in a 245-page report delivered to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Jay Gannett / CC BY-SA 2.0

A U.S. Fish and Wildlife biologist has pleaded guilty in a yearslong criminal enterprise of hunting, skinning and selling dozens of Colorado bobcat pelts.

The Daily Sentinel reports 46-year-old Thad Bingham pleaded guilty Wednesday in federal court to a felony count of transporting and selling the pelts to international fur traders.

Wyoming is the latest state in the Mountain West region to be sued by conservation groups over how a federal wildlife kill program is conducted in the state.

Sakarri / Flickr

In Wyoming 19 wolves have been killed during the first seven weeks of this year's hunting season. It's a much smaller number than last year, when 12 were harvested in just the first few days and trophy game kills overall totaled 43.

One possible explanation could be the warm fall weather. This year's hunting season started on Sept. 1, a month earlier than last year.

Scott Becker, the northern Rocky Mountain wolf coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, said it can be easier to hunt wolves in the winter.

Yellowstone National Park / Flickr

Eleven grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem have been euthanized since the beginning of September in a "particularly bad month" for grizzly conflicts, the Powell Tribune in Wyoming reports.

That rate may be normal for the fall.

Luke Runyon / KUNC

The temperature is hovering right around 90 degrees the day Dale Ryden and I float down the Colorado River near Grand Junction, Colorado. The water looks so inviting, a cool reprieve from the heat, but if either of us jumped in we’d be electrocuted.

“It can actually probably be lethal to people if you get in there,” Ryden, a fish biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, says.

The Department of Interior just released a new science policy that it says will increase transparency. But conservationists are concerned. 

A U.S. district court hearing Thursday could decide the fate of grizzly bears living around Yellowstone National Park.

The Interior Department is once again facing change in agency leadership. The acting head of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has stepped down. 

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