U.S. Forest Service

Mark Byzewski / CC BY 2.0

The U.S. Forest Service has canceled a decision to use chain saws to clear trees killed by bark beetles in two wilderness areas in southwestern Colorado.

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A group of wildlife advocates is suing the federal government, saying they need to have more of a role in helping to prevent grizzly bear deaths on national forest land in Idaho and Wyoming.


The chief of the U.S. Forest Service is warning that a billion acres of land across America are at risk of catastrophic wildfires like last fall's deadly Camp Fire that destroyed most of Paradise, Calif.

Dr. Dan West / Colorado State Forest Service

The U.S. Forest Service has authorized the use of chain saws to clear trees killed by bark beetles in two wilderness areas in southwestern Colorado.

The Durango Herald reports Rocky Mountain Regional Forester Brian Ferebee last week approved the use of the motorized equipment in the Weminuche and South San Juan wilderness areas from June through mid-August.

Vail Ski Resort
Joe Lin / CC BY 2.0

The U.S. Forest Service has approved an expansion of the Golden Peak area at Colorado's Vail Mountain ski resort.

Vail Daily reports the project will double the training space on Golden Peak utilized by Ski and Snowboard Club Vail.

Colorado is far from Washington, D.C., but impacts of the partial government shutdown are hitting the state's workforce.

More than 2,000 federal workers in Colorado have applied for unemployment since the shutdown began last month. Most are in Jefferson County, but a large concentration also work in Boulder, Larimer and Weld Counties.

KUNC has been asking for your stories. This week we heard from three individuals in northern Colorado. These are their experiences, in their own words.

Cowgirl Jules / Flickr

With wildfires burning through much of the West, there’s high demand for big aircraft to come in and battle the flames from above.

If there's a fee for either a camping site or a day use area on Forest Service land, there's probably some kind of toilet there. But solving the problem of human waste in vaulted or backcountry toilets is not as easy as flushing it out of the system.

Paul Hermans / Wikimedia Commons

Stand near a river and you’ll hear a symphony of sounds: birds chirping, frogs croaking and water flowing. But what would it sound like if the stream itself could be transformed into classical music?

David Merritt, a Colorado-based researcher and musician, is helping answer that question by turning river data into music to hear how we’ve changed rivers throughout the West.

President Trump’s pick to oversee the Forest Service went before a Senate committee Tuesday.

 


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