Vote

Jackie Hai / KUNC

Thousands of 17-year-olds are eligible to vote in Colorado's upcoming presidential primary for the first time under a new state law.

The law allows 17-year-olds to cast ballots in spring primaries if they turn 18 before November's general election. At least seven states and Washington, D.C., have similar laws.

When Neylan McBaine told her friends in Brooklyn that she was moving to Salt Lake City a few years ago, she was shocked by the negative reactions she got. People warned her that Utah was unfriendly to women.

"I got a lot of comments that my girls were not going to be raised in an environment that empowered them," she said. "They were going to be told that they couldn't work, and would have no examples of modern women to look up to."

A nonprofit group wants to see more unmarried women, young people and people of color on the nation's voter rolls, so it recently sent 9 million letters urging those groups to register.

But the mailers have upset some election officials, who say they've left voters confused.

The mailers clearly state that they're from the Voter Participation Center or its sister organization, the Center for Voter Information. But the letter inside looks like it could come from the government.

Brad Simpson
Stephanie Daniel / KUNC

After two decades in prison, Brad Simpson became a free man on Sept. 30. The 39-year-old has never paid rent, had an email account or registered to vote until now.

“If I don’t vote, I don’t have a chance to complain. I don’t have a chance to voice my opinion. I don’t have a chance to make the decision of whether or not I wanted this to happen or not,” Simpson said.