World War II

Courtesy Ted Hummell

A few years ago, Ted Hummell got an odd call. It was the Department of Defense and they wanted his help in their efforts to identify the remains of his uncle, William Hellstern. Hummell, a 67-year-old Jaguar dealer who lives in Castle Rock, knew his uncle through his late mom.

"She cried every Dec. 7," Hummell said.

Courtesy of the Amache Preservation Society

In the spring of 1942, official posters went up across the West Coast and Arizona. All people of Japanese ancestry had one week to report to assembly centers. Ultimately, more than 100,000 Japanese-Americans were forcibly imprisoned in internment camps, many of them located in the Mountain West. This week is when we remember those camps and the people who lived in them.

One of them was a 13-year-old boy named Minoru Tonai.

Courtesy of Moon Theatre Production

As the former editor for the Berthoud Weekly Surveyor, Rick Padden knows a good story when he reads one. When the newspaper ran a story about Camp 202 -- dubbed Camp Greeley -- where 1,500 German prisoners of war were housed during World War II, Padden was inspired.

β€œIt almost wrote itself,” he said. β€œI literally wrote the basic play in 21 days.”

Why We're Growing The Most Sweet Potatoes Since WWII

Jan 25, 2017
USDA / Flickr

Sweet potatoes are undergoing a modern renaissance in this country.

While they have always made special appearances on many American tables around the holidays, year-round demand for the root vegetables has grown. In 2015, farmers produced more sweet potatoes than in any year since World War II.