Coronavirus In Colorado: News And Resources | KUNC

Coronavirus In Colorado: News And Resources

KUNC is here to keep you up-to-date on the news about COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, and answer your questions about Colorado's response to its spread in our state.

For the latest updates, follow along on KUNC's live blog here 

Questions And Answers
Does It Live On Clothes? Can My Dog Infect Me? Any Advice On Wipes?
Quarantine? Self-Isolation? Social Distancing? What They Mean And When To Do Them
Coronavirus FAQs: What's 'Flattening The Curve'? Should I Travel?
Coronavirus And Parenting: What You Need To Know Now
How Safe Is Public Transit As The Coronavirus Spreads In Colorado?
Common Questions About The Coronavirus In Colorado, Answered
Submit Your Questions To Curious Colorado

Resources
• Colorado's Statewide Stay-At-Home Order, Explained
A Quick Glossary Of Coronavirus Terms
What COVID-19 Numbers Can (And Can't) Tell Us
Here Are The Front Range Schools Offering Meals To Students Amid COVID-19 Closures
The New Coronavirus Can Live On Surfaces For 2-3 Days — Here's How To Clean Them
Coronavirus Symptoms: Defining Mild, Moderate And Severe

Official Documents
CDPHE Downloadable COVID-19 Fact Sheet (Versión en español)
Colorado Stay-At-Home Executive Order
City of Boulder "Stay At Home" Emergency Order
City of Denver "Stay At Home" Executed Public Health Order
State Public Health Order Closing Bars, Restaurants, Theaters, Gyms And Casinos

Testing Data
Daily updates from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Education on positive COVID-19 cases in our state are available here.

Regional data compiled by the Mountain West News Bureau can be seen below:

Billy Barr

“The snow’s going sideways, it’s swirling,” said Billy Barr, from the abandoned silver mine he lives in at more than 12,000 feet in altitude in the Rocky Mountains.

We’re all social distancing these days, and it’s unclear when exactly that will end. But Barr has been doing this for almost 50 years. He’s the only full-time resident of Gothic, Colorado. 

“I'm the mayor and chief of police,” he said. “I hold elections every year but I don't tell anybody when they are, so it works out really well.”

Updated at 10:51 a.m. ET

A record 3.28 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits last week as the coronavirus pandemic shut down much of the country. The Labor Department's report for the week ended March 21 was one of the first official indicators of how many people have suddenly been forced out of work nationally.

In the prior report, for the week ended March 14, initial claims totaled 282,000.

Despite urgent pleas from governors and mayors across the country, Defense Secretary Mark Esper cautioned on Wednesday that the U.S. military is not positioned to deploy nearly enough medical resources to address the scale of the coronavirus outbreak. And warning that the pandemic will "inevitably" alter the global strategic balance, he said the virus cannot be allowed to overtake national security as the Pentagon's top priority.

The small city of Barstow, Calif., sits in the remote Mojave Desert between Los Angeles and Las Vegas. It's rural, yet hardly isolated, at a major crossroads with a lot of people coming and going. An outbreak of the coronavirus could overwhelm its 30-bed hospital.

Scott Franz / Capitol Coverage

To help curb the spread of COVID-19, Gov. Jared Polis has issued a statewide stay-at-home order that goes into effect Thursday morning at 6 a.m.

Coloradans will still be able to go outside to get groceries, take walks and care for loved ones. But Polis is ordering most of the state’s 5.7 million residents to stay at home at all other times.

The order does not apply to essential workers like doctors and first responders.

Michael de Yoanna / KUNC

As coronavirus cases rise in Colorado, so does demand for the supplies needed to fight the pandemic. That includes surgical masks, gloves and gowns — all the personal protective equipment vital to preventing health care workers from getting COVID-19 themselves.

Communities are deeply concerned that supplies will run out — as well as hospital beds. The state's own stockpiles have already taken a hit as Gov. Jared Polis warns that federal aid to Colorado has so far been insufficient.

Michael de Yoanna / KUNC

Today on Colorado Edition: We check in on several Colorado industries to see how they're faring amid the coronavirus outbreak. We also hear about the people working to find medical supplies at a time when they're hard to come by.

As the COVID-19 pandemic intensifies, some communities will be better equipped to treat the sickest patients — specifically those requiring admission to intensive care units — than others. Not only do ICU capabilities vary from hospital to hospital, but also some parts of the country have far more critical care beds by population than others.

An NPR analysis of data from the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice looked at how the nation's 100,000 ICU beds are distributed across the more than 300 markets that make up the country's hospital system.

Updated at 1:50 a.m. ET Thursday

The White House's pandemic task force convened another briefing on Wednesday afternoon amid a tense denouement for legislation aimed at helping an economy poleaxed by the disaster.

Last-minute objections on Wednesday delayed the Senate vote until late in the evening, when it passed on a vote of 96 to 0.

With just about 500,000 employees, the United States Postal Service is one of the country's largest employers, but many workers say they're not receiving the training or supplies they need to deal safely with the coronavirus. They fear becoming carriers of another kind — catching and unwittingly spreading the virus.

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