Curious Colorado

You have questions, we know how to find the answers.

Curious Colorado is a series where we turn the editorial tables on our listeners by asking what they want to know about the events, stories and topics that affect Colorado.

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Previous Curious Colorado Topics

We are still taking your questions and comments on the following Curious Colorado topics. If you have something to share, don't hesitate!

Educating Colorado's Changing Workforce
SB 181: Colorado's Oil and Gas Bill
#MeToo and You
Art You Love & Art You Loathe
Growth in Colorado
The Opioid Epidemic
Transportation
Water in the West

Courtesy of Shelly Robinson

The messages covering Haystack Rock's graffiti-stained surface are not for the faint of heart. Take the mustard-yellow words spray-painted on its southwest side:

"F.U. CSU."

Move a few steps to the left and you'll get an entirely different picture: A carefully planned mural for a lost loved one.

National Park Service

We know Colorado has mountain lions, coyotes, rattlesnakes, tarantulas and black bears... but what about grizzly bears? 

A listener submitted the question to our Curious Colorado project asking about just that. "When was the last grizzly bear seen in the state?"

U.S. Forest Service

Six years ago this month, there was a flood across the northern Front Range. In addition to destroying homes, roads and businesses, the floods also took out a popular trail in the Poudre Canyon, a trail called the Young Gulch trail. 

And the trail still hasn't re-opened, which prompted a listener to ask, "why?"

KUNC's Colorado Edition called Reghan Cloudman, a public affairs specialist with the U.S. Forest Service, to learn more. 

Matt Bloom / KUNC

The Senate passed sweeping oil and gas legislation on Wednesday, confirming several House amendments requested by industry representatives concerned about its economic impacts. The bill now heads to Gov. Polis’ desk, where he’s expected to sign it.

Oil and gas
Matt Bloom / KUNC

The Colorado House passed a major overhaul of oil and gas regulations in a final hearing Friday morning, sending the legislation back to the full Senate one last time to approve amendments.

Lawmakers voted 36-28 to approve Senate Bill 19-181. One House member was absent.

KUNC's Colorado Edition: Five Years Later

Sep 14, 2018
Courtesy of Kerry Grimes

On this week's Colorado Edition, we're doing something a little different. It's been five years since the September 2013 floods that brought devastation to many Colorado communities. We take a look back at what happened, and at how communities are recovering today.

Michael Forsberg

In June KUNC posed a Curious Colorado question to listeners: "Are you a teacher - or do you know one - who has to get a summer job to make ends meet? Share your plans with us."

Kery Harrelson, the IT Director for East Grand School District in Granby, Colorado, responded, saying he 'crisscrossed' the Continental Divide.

His summer break essay follows:

Over my summer break I walked about 180 miles.

I've been the IT Director for East Grand Schools for well over a decade but have worked several side and summer jobs as well. I've been a bellman, a raft guide, freelance computer tech, network engineer and graphic designer. Colorado home prices can be prohibitively high so my side jobs - especially my latest - have been essential in augmenting my income and ultimately allowing me to buy my house.

Ben Brown

In June KUNC posed a Curious Colorado question to listeners: "Are you a teacher - or do you know one - who has to get a summer job to make ends meet? Share your plans with us."

Ben Brown, a sixth grade science and design thinking teacher in Summit County, responded, saying he spent 20 years working in the private sector before becoming a teacher. He loves teaching.

His summer break essay follows:

Over my summer break, I launched a business.

The last bell of the school year rang. I watched students stream out of the school, excited about what summer will bring. Their excitement is always so infectious. I packed up my classroom, I completed my end of year checklist, high fived my colleagues and then headed out of the building myself.

If you ever hear a teacher say they don't like summer break, I think they're lying. I love summer.

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