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10:19am

Sat August 30, 2014
Politics

Rick Perry's Legal Trouble: The Line Between Influence And Coercion

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 10:33 am

Texas Gov. Rick Perry talks to the media and supporters after he was booked on August 19 in Austin. Perry is charged with abuse of office and coercing a public official.
Eric Gay AP

The day he was booked, Texas Gov. Rick Perry gave a big smile for his mug shot — which was then printed up on t-shirts to demonstrate just what a farce he thought the indictment was. In a press conference, the scorn dripped from Perry's voice as he took up the sword — defender, not of himself, but of the state's constitution.

"We don't settle political differences with indictments in this country," he said. "It is outrageous that some would use partisan political theatrics to rip away at the very fabric of our state's constitution."

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9:45am

Sat August 30, 2014
Animals

Making Sure Those Walking Horses Aren't Hurting Horses

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 11:53 am

Trainer Jimmy McConnell of Shelbyville, Tenn., rides champion walking horse Watch It Now before a 2009 football game in Knoxville, Tenn. Celebrations of the breed's distinctive gait are a 75-year-old tradition, but animal rights activists say that for many of those decades, the walking horse industry has abused animals to get their knees even higher.
Wade Payne AP

In Shelbyville, Tenn., the Tennessee walking horse is an icon and a way of life. For 10 nights in August, thousands of fans cheer from their box seats as well-manicured horses prance around a dirt oval track.

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5:47am

Sat August 30, 2014
Parallels

The Wall That Defined Scotland's Frontier 2,000 Years Ago To Today

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 10:33 am

Hadrian's Wall marks the Roman Empire's northernmost boundary, and at one point is less than a mile from today's border between England and Scotland.
Ari Shapiro NPR

About 2,000 years ago, the Roman Empire stretched from the Middle East all the way across Western Europe. A wall marked the empire's northernmost boundary, at one point less than a mile from today's border between England and Scotland.

The Roman emperor Hadrian built the 73-mile wall at this point to keep the unruly Scottish out. When the Scottish vote in an independence referendum on Sept. 18, they will be deciding whether they want to separate from the rest of Britain.

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5:47am

Sat August 30, 2014
Simon Says

Syrian Artists Denied Visas, And A Voice In The U.S.

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 10:31 pm

Syria: The Trojan Women inserts current events into an ancient Greek tragedy, performed here in Amman, Jordan, in 2013.
Lynn Alleva Lilley Lynn Alleva Lilley

The Trojan Women, by Euripides, is a Greek tragedy written 2,500 years ago that war keeps timely.

It's about a group of women who struggle to survive in Troy after the town has been sacked. When one of the women cries out, "Our country, our conquered country, perishes ... O land that reared my children!" it's hard not to hear those words echo today, through Syria, in Iraq and in Ukraine.

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5:47am

Sat August 30, 2014
Music Interviews

Anthony D'Amato: A Songsmith Schooled By A Master Poet

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 10:33 am

Anthony D'Amato's latest album is The Shipwreck from the Shore.
Bianca Bourgeois Courtesy of the artist

When Anthony D'Amato was a junior at Princeton, he slipped a home-burned CD under the door of a professor — not a professor of music, and certainly no record executive.

It was the door of Paul Muldoon, the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, critic and poetry editor of The New Yorker, who began to work with D'Amato. Five years later, the student is on the music scene, winning praise for folk-rock songs that demonstrate a plain, sometimes flip poetry of their own.

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