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5:31am

Tue July 22, 2014
The Two-Way

Book News: Thomas Berger, Author Of 'Little Big Man,' Dies

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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2:45am

Tue July 22, 2014
Environment

'Our Birds': Migratory Journeys Converge In Baltimore Gardens

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 11:13 am

Members of the Bird Ambassadors program painted and planted a broken canoe at a Baltimore charter school in November. The canoe was filled with species native to Maryland, providing food and habitat for local birds.
Susie Creamer Courtesy of Patterson Park Audubon Center

A couple of times a month, a group of migrant women and their children gather to plant shrubs and flowers in Baltimore's expansive Patterson Park.

The gardens feed and shelter migratory birds as part of the Patterson Park Audubon Center's Bird Ambassadors program.

Neotropical birds like the black-throated blue warbler and the Baltimore oriole migrate from the East Coast down to places like Mexico and Central America for the winter, says Susie Creamer, director of urban education and conservation at the center.

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2:45am

Tue July 22, 2014
U.S.

Other Cities Poach Police From Detroit's Low-Wage Force

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 1:11 pm

Officer Michael Crowder says his roots are too deep to leave Detroit, but he knows younger officers who were lured away by better pay.
Dawn Uhl-Zifilippo

In a Detroit police squad car, Officer Michael Crowder cruises through one of the city's more well-to-do neighborhoods.

Crowder says he loves his current assignment — concentrating on a specific neighborhood community. But he notes that these are tough economic times in Detroit, and that's effecting everyone here — including the police.

"We've had food drives where the community comes up to the precinct," he says. "They'll give us baskets of food. Two, three years now, we've had officers depend on Goodfellow packages."

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2:45am

Tue July 22, 2014
Fine Art

With Swirls Of Steel, These Sculptures Mark The Passage Of People And Time

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 11:13 am

Albert Paley's iron and steel gates, archways and free-standing sculptures are eye-catching landmarks. His 2010 steel work Evanesce stands in Monterrey, Mexico. "American Metal: The Art of Albert Paley" is on display at the Corcoran Gallery of Art until September.
Agencia para la Planeacióndel Desarrollo Urbano de Nuevo León Courtesy Paley Studios

Growing up in Philadelphia in the 1940s, Albert Paley played with blocks and Legos. And he loved wandering the streets, scavenging bottle caps, matchbook covers, cigar bands and "picking up pebbles that I thought were interesting," he recalls.

Now 70, the American sculptor has moved from pebbles to monumental gates. His iron and steel works adorn Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, St. Louis, Chattanooga, Tenn., and Rochester, N.Y. His gates, archways and free-standing sculptures are eye-catching landmarks.

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2:45am

Tue July 22, 2014
Goats and Soda

Ebola Is A Deadly Virus — But Doctors Say It Can Be Beaten

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 6:34 pm

Sylvester Jusu is a volunteer who works with the Red Cross burial team in Sierra Leone.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Saidu Kanneh was given a hero's welcome last week when he walked into a community meeting about Ebola in a tiny village of mud huts in the Kissi Kama region of Sierra Leone. Kanneh was diagnosed with Ebola early in July, was treated for 12 days in a Doctors Without Borders hospital and overcame the disease.

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