Colorado Senate Republicans

Colorado Newspaper Battle Could Define What’s ‘Fake News’ And What’s Not

A Colorado newspaper is fighting claims that it peddles fake news stories. The publisher of Grand Junction’s Daily Sentinel is accusing a state lawmaker of defamation and threatening a lawsuit. If filed, legal experts said it would be the first of its kind, potentially setting a legal definition for what is considered fake news and what is not. The dispute began with an opinion column in the newspaper supporting a bill that would give journalists and others greater access to public records. Sen. Ray Scott, a Republican of Grand Junction who serves as assistant majority leader in the Senate, postponed the hearing and vote.

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Stephanie Paige Ogburn / KUNC

Citing the need for a “professional presentation” to Congress and the American people, Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Calif.) announced the newly-formed Congressional Cannabis Caucus at a news conference Feb. 16. The caucus, which includes four Democratic and Republican representatives from states that have legalized marijuana, plans to focus on freeing up banking and tax regulations, opening up research dollars and removing marijuana from the federal list of illegal drugs.

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Colorado is roughly a third of the way through the four-month long legislative session. John Frank, a reporter for The Denver Post, and Peter Marcus with ColoradoPolitics.com sat down with statehouse reporter Bente Birkeland to take stock of the big issues this session.

Sony Pictures

Pedro Almodóvar opens Julieta with undulating folds of red cloth. When the shot widens, it turns out to be Julieta’s dress. She’s about to move, so her apartment looks spare and muted. The rich, voluminous red dress sets you back on your heels and announces that what’s coming will be at least one, and probably more stories that are as bold as the color.

The action in the U.S. school system is overwhelmingly local. But the federal government, and the courts, have an important hand in many issues that touch classrooms — from civil rights to international programs of study. We looked at the records of some of President Trump's key appointees to see how they might affect education in the years to come.

Jeff Sessions, attorney general (confirmed)

This weekend marks 75 years since President Roosevelt's executive order that sent Japanese-Americans to internment camps.

Roy Ebihara and his wife, 82-year-old Aiko, were children then, and both were held in camps with their families.

At StoryCorps, 83-year-old Roy told Aiko about what happened in his hometown of Clovis, N.M., in the weeks just before the executive order was issued.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police are reporting a flurry of illegal crossings into Canada in recent months. Officials say Quebec province has seen the highest influx of people seeking asylum, with many crossing in snowy, remote areas in northern New York.

One illegal crossing area that has become particularly popular among immigrants is in Champlain, N.Y., in the northeast corner of the state.

The BBC nature series Planet Earth II doesn't debut on BBC America until Saturday, but one of its scenes has already been viewed online more than 9 million times. The two-minute clip shows a baby iguana running for its life through a pit of hungry snakes. (Does he make it? Watch the clip below to find out ...)

Timothy Showalter is a tough-looking guy with a beard, tattoos and a flat Midwestern accent, who's pretty open about taking drugs. He thinks a lot about where life is taking him.

"I read somewhere that the idea of joy, and to live a joyful life, is different than living a happy life," he tells NPR's Steve Inskeep. "Happiness is fleeting. Happiness is something that you're always going to reach for but you're never gonna quite get or be satisfied with."

House Republicans are debating a plan to replace the Affordable Care Act that would give consumers tax credits to buy insurance, cut back on Medicaid and allow people to save their own money to pay for health care costs.

The outline plan is likely to take away some of the financial help low-income families get through Obamacare subsidies, and also result in fewer people being covered under the Medicaid health care program for the poor.

Colorado Senate Republicans

A Colorado newspaper is fighting claims that it peddles fake news stories. The publisher of Grand Junction’s Daily Sentinel is accusing a state lawmaker of defamation and threatening a lawsuit. If filed, legal experts said it would be the first of its kind, potentially setting a legal definition for what is considered fake news and what is not.

The dispute began with an opinion column in the newspaper supporting a bill that would give journalists and others greater access to public records. Sen. Ray Scott, a Republican of Grand Junction who serves as assistant majority leader in the Senate, postponed the hearing and vote.

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