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Matt Bloom/KUNC

Vets 'Step Out' Of Their Comfort Zones To Dance, Heal In New Class

A woman with electric blonde hair and floral print pants floated among the six dancing couples, stopping only to correct a step or give praise. “Step! Step together, step! Step! Step together, step!” she yelled over the Diana Krall song coming from a stereo in the corner of the room. “So, scoot a little instead of marching, ok?!” The floorboards in the basement of the Masonic Temple in Fort Collins creaked beneath Sandy Newlin’s feet as she came to a stop. Next to her stood a tall man wearing...

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Ken Lund / Flickr

Two accusers who filed workplace harassment complaints at Colorado’s Capitol against Sen. Randy Baumgardner are now releasing the full investigative findings to the public.

The investigations from Alternative Dispute Resolution Inc. found allegations that Baumgardner, a Republican from Hot Sulphur Springs, sexually harassed people and was inappropriate to be credible. In a story on Monday (April 23), we reported on some of the key findings, involving six additional people who brought allegations as a result of the investigation.

Allan Monga, a junior at Deering High School in Portland, Maine, traveled to Washington, D.C. to compete in the Poetry Out Loud contest on Monday. It's a national competition in which students recite great works of poetry, and it's run by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation.

But Monga, who says he fled violence in his home country of Zambia, was initially barred from the national final because of his immigration status: He's an asylum seeker and does not yet have U.S. citizenship.

In 1993, Alex Wagner saw a familiar face on the cover of Time magazine: It was a computer-generated picture of a multiethnic woman who reminded her of ... herself.

Wagner's father is white and from the Midwest; her mother is from what was then Burma. And after reading the Time story on "The New Face of America," Wagner, then a teenager, decided to embrace her identity as a "futureface."

Matt Bloom/KUNC

A woman with electric blonde hair and floral print pants floated among the six dancing couples, stopping only to correct a step or give praise.

“Step! Step together, step! Step! Step together, step!” she yelled over the Diana Krall song coming from a stereo in the corner of the room. “So, scoot a little instead of marching, ok?!”

The floorboards in the basement of the Masonic Temple in Fort Collins creaked beneath Sandy Newlin’s feet as she came to a stop.

Most weekday mornings, after feeding the chickens, goat and cows, Nicolas Talbott drives through the rolling hills of Columbiana County in eastern Ohio to one of the schools where he is a substitute teacher. It was a busy winter — lots of teachers out with the flu. And while Talbott enjoys teaching, he hopes to move on soon, to a career in the U.S. Air Force working on global security.

"I want to serve my country, I want to serve the people in this country and I want to serve the Constitution of the United States," Talbott says, "no matter who is in office in our government."

Updated at 5:20 p.m. ET

Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, President Trump's pick to lead the Veterans Affairs Department, has been accused of creating a hostile work environment, drinking while on duty and improperly prescribing drugs to staff during his time as White House doctor to two administrations, according to Montana Sen. Jon Tester.

Courtesy of the Office of Rep. Doug Lamborn

Less than a day after Colorado's Supreme Court ruled Congressman Doug Lamborn should be stricken from the Republican Party's primary ballot, his campaign is looking to the federal courts for reprieve.

"We are disappointed by the outcome and we believe it was wrongly decided," Lamborn campaign spokesperson Dan Bayens said of the state court ruling in a statement.

President Trump's tariffs on imported steel aren't the first time the industry has gotten protection from the U.S. government. Not by a long shot. In fact, tariff protection for the industry — which politicians often say is a vital national interest — goes back to the very beginning of the republic.

In his book, Clashing Over Commerce: A History of U.S. Trade Policy, Dartmouth professor Douglas Irwin writes that protection for the metal producers began in the 1790s.

Facebook announced changes to its content review policy Tuesday, adding an appeals process for removed content and releasing the internal guidelines it relies on to make content determinations.

While the social media giant has listed a set of publicly available community standards for several years, the latest update includes the more detailed guidelines that content reviewers use internally when deciding whether to allow or remove posts.

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Colorado Edition

StoryCorps is in Fort Collins on April 19

The StoryCorps mobile tour is coming to Fort Collins. Get more details and add your name to the wait list for a recording spot.