Scott Dressel-Martin / Courtesy of Denver Botanic Gardens

Revenge Of Stinky: Denver Botanic Gardens' Corpse Flower May Bloom In September

After three years, “Stinky” -- the Denver Botanic Gardens’ beloved corpse flower -- may be preparing to bloom again. Denver Botanic Gardens horticulturist Nicholas Giaquinto predicted the rare bloom, which is said to give off an odor much like rotting corpse, to occur in early to mid-September. Officially known as the “amorphophallus titanum,” it’s related to common house plants the philodendron and the peace lily, Giaquinto said. The rancid smell is used to attract pollinators such as flies and beetles. The potent plant also attracts humans.

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Ben Brown

In June KUNC posed a Curious Colorado question to listeners: "Are you a teacher - or do you know one - who has to get a summer job to make ends meet? Share your plans with us."

Ben Brown, a sixth grade science and design thinking teacher in Summit County, responded, saying he spent 20 years working in the private sector before becoming a teacher. He loves teaching.

His summer break essay follows:

Over my summer break, I launched a business.

The last bell of the school year rang. I watched students stream out of the school, excited about what summer will bring. Their excitement is always so infectious. I packed up my classroom, I completed my end of year checklist, high fived my colleagues and then headed out of the building myself.

If you ever hear a teacher say they don't like summer break, I think they're lying. I love summer.

Florida this week declared a state of emergency because of a slow-moving natural disaster — red tide.

Red tide is toxic algae that have persisted off Florida's Gulf Coast for nearly a year. In recent weeks, the algae bloom has worsened, killing fish, turtles and dolphins and discouraging tourism on some of the state's most beautiful beaches.

Sarah Weeks

In June KUNC posed a Curious Colorado question to listeners: "Are you a teacher - or do you know one - who has to get a summer job to make ends meet? Share your plans with us."

Sarah Weeks, a K-5 media specialist and STEM teacher at Lopez Elementary School in Fort Collins, responded, saying she loves her job but can't live off her teaching salary alone.

Her summer break essay follows:

Maya Angelou said, "My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style."

I'm discovering that this quote captures the essence of my philosophy of life and my career as a professional educator.

Scott Dressel-Martin / Courtesy of Denver Botanic Gardens

After three years, “Stinky” -- the Denver Botanic Gardens’ beloved corpse flower -- may be preparing to bloom again.

Denver Botanic Gardens horticulturist Nicholas Giaquinto predicted the rare bloom, which is said to give off an odor much like rotting corpse, to occur in early to mid-September.

Officially known as the “amorphophallus titanum,” it’s related to common house plants the philodendron and the peace lily, Giaquinto said. The rancid smell is used to attract pollinators such as flies and beetles.

The potent plant also attracts humans.

Katie Lazar / Serve Colorado

Denver ranked fifth among large cities with the highest number of residents who choose to serve in AmeriCorps programs.

Every year the Corporation for National and Community Service, which administers national service and volunteer programs, ranks the cities and states that produce the most AmeriCorps members.

Barbara Stewart, CEO of the Corporation for National and Community Service, said there's a spirit of service and volunteerism in Denver that's infectious.

Ashley Jefcoat / KUNC

This year's governor's race is like no other in Colorado history -- at least in terms of money. The $29 million contributed so far to candidates shatters prior records. A large chunk of that money comes from millionaires, spending big in hopes of being elected to a job that pays $90,000 a year.

"There actually are no limits to what an individual can contribute to their own campaign," said Steve Bouey, a manager with the elections division of the Secretary of State's Office.

The last time Pablo saw his son was in Texas.

Pablo and his 7-year-old son crossed the Rio Grande illegally and turned themselves in to Border Patrol agents. They were separated by force, and Pablo was deported back to Guatemala — without his son. Immigration officials tried to assure him that his son would follow in a week.

That was three months ago.

"You can't live without a child," Pablo said through an interpreter.

In Germany, beer consumption is up as temperatures remain unusually high. This is good and bad news for the beer industry.

While the breweries have more than enough beer to go around, they're running out of bottles because customers are not returning their empties quickly enough.

Germans care about the environment about as much as their beer; that's why the glass bottles are recycled. Customers pay a small deposit on each one, which they get back when they return it to a store.

The history of jazz in the 20th century is well known, but the course of the genre in the 21st century is still being charted. According to Nate Chinen, music critic for NPR Music and WBGO, jazz in the new millennium has enjoyed a type of Renaissance thanks to some key players.

In the marble halls of Mumbai's Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital, patients are greeted by chandeliers and floor-to-ceiling French windows.

There are autism and Alzheimer's clinics, genetic testing, clinical trials of new drugs and private rooms. Spinal injuries are treated in a special robotics rehabilitation unit, where patients are hooked up to robots to exercise their limbs.

And visitors can grab a Starbucks latte in the lobby.

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