English Language Learners: How Your State Is Doing

About 1 out of every 10 public school students in the United States right now is learning to speak English. They're called ELLs, for "English Language Learners." There are nearly 5 million of them, and educating them — in English and all the other subjects and skills they'll need — is one of the biggest challenges in U.S. public education today. As part of our reporting project, 5 Million Voices , we set out to gather up all the data and information we could find about who these students are...

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https://press.atairbnb.com/media-assets/ / Air Bnb

Home sharing services have become very popular in Colorado, and local municipalities are paying attention. Between Feb. 20 – 24, more than 1,000 notices were mailed to Denver hosts for being in violation of a city ordinance. The ordinance, passed last June, require hosts to have short-term rental licenses and collect Denver’s 10.75 percent lodging tax.

Once hosts obtain a license, they must post it on their listing in order to avoid any fines. The license fee is $25, and the fines for failing to obtain a license can range from $150 to nearly $1,000.

Sony Pictures

Maran Ade’s Toni Erdmann is one of the most genuinely and deliberately awkward movies I’ve ever seen. It has moments where the characters look like they’re frozen in place, befuddled by their situations and wondering what to do. The picture can be absurd, or ridiculous, and in its best moments it feels something like ineffable. And then, at other times, Toni Erdmann is so tender it can break your heart.

Stephanie Paige Ogburn / KUNC

The conflict over oil and gas drilling -- as well as hydraulic fracturing -- has led to multiple protests, votes and court decisions in Colorado. Most recently, Colorado Attorney General Cynthia Coffman began proceedings to sue Boulder County over its lack of new drilling permits.

But the history of oil and gas development and regulation in Colorado is a long one. Here’s how we got to where we are today.

Bente Birkeland / Capitol Coverage

Republican state Sen. Ray Scott could help define one of the most often used phrases of 2017: fake news. 

The battle centers around an opinion column published in the Grand Junction Daily Sentinel about Senate Bill 40, a bill to increase access to public records. The column implies that a scheduled hearing was postponed because Scott -- who serves as assistant majority leader -- didn’t support it. 

About 1 out of every 10 public school students in the United States right now is learning to speak English. They're called ELLs, for "English Language Learners."

There are nearly 5 million of them, and educating them — in English and all the other subjects and skills they'll need — is one of the biggest challenges in U.S. public education today.

The proposed border wall between the U.S. and Mexico would run right through Native lands, and tribal leaders in the region say it would desecrate sacred sites.

"Over my dead body will we build a wall," says Verlon Jose, vice chairman of the Tohono O'odham Nation. "It's like me going into your home and saying 'You know what? I believe in order to protect your house we need some adjusting.' And you're going to say, 'Wait a minute, who are you to come into my house and tell me how to protect my home?' " he says.

This story is part of Kitchen Table Conversations, a series from NPR's National Desk that examines how Americans from all walks of life are moving forward from the presidential election.

Keitra Bates is standing in front of an empty storefront on Atlanta's Westside. The walls are yellow-painted stucco over cinder blocks, with iron bars on the windows and doors, and a small side yard littered with abandoned tires. A corner store, the Fair Street Superette, is next door.

No matter where you stand on the political spectrum, health care under the Affordable Care Act is going to change in the next few years. The Republican-led Congress has vowed to "repeal and replace" the health law known as Obamacare.

That has left many people anxious and confused about what will happen and when. So NPR's Morning Edition asked listeners to post questions on Twitter and Facebook, and we will be answering some of them here and on the radio in the weeks ahead.

Scientists around the United States are getting ready to do an unprecedented experiment: They plan to march en masse in Washington, D.C., and other cities on April 22, to take a stand for the importance of public policies based on science.

Some researchers predict that this March for Science will release much needed energy and enthusiasm at a time when science is under threat; others worry it will damage science's reputation as an unbiased seeker of truth.

In the waning years of the Civil War, advertisements like this began appearing in newspapers around the country:

"INFORMATION WANTED By a mother concerning her children.

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