Lead Stories

1:47pm

Thu March 26, 2015
Health

In County Rankings, NoCO Is Pretty Healthy, DougCO Ranks Number One

Colorado's 64 counties were ranked based on factors like high school graduation rates, tobacco use, access to healthy food as well as teen births and obesity.
Credit County Health Rankings / Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

People in Northern Colorado counties are healthier than in most other parts of the state.

That's the finding of an annual report which ranked Colorado’s 64 counties based on factors like high school graduation rates, tobacco use, access to healthy food as well as teen births and obesity. Broomfield County came in second and Boulder County ranked third. Larimer rose to 10th place from their 2014 position, while Weld County ranked 35th.

Douglas County ranked No. 1 in the health factors analysis, just as it was in the most recent Kids Count report. Denver was toward the bottom at 48th.

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6:16am

Thu March 26, 2015

11:29am

Wed March 25, 2015
The Salt

Meet The Cool Beans Designed To Beat Climate Change

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 3:16 pm

These beans, grown on test plots at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture in Colombia, can thrive in temperatures that cripple most conventional beans.
Courtesy of CIAT/Neil Palmer

A planet that is warming at extraordinary speed may require extraordinary new food crops. The latest great agricultural hope is beans that can thrive in temperatures that cripple most conventional beans. They're now growing in test plots of the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, or CIAT, in Colombia.

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6:09am

Wed March 25, 2015

5:26am

Wed March 25, 2015
Education

Testing Reform Remains In A Holding Pattern At The Legislature

Gov. John Hickenlooper touting SB 215 alongside Senate Pres. Bill Cadman, Speaker of the House Dickey Lee Hullinghorst, and Kelly Brough, the president of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce. The measure is now being reworked.
Bente Birkeland RMCR

On average students in Colorado classrooms take more than two-dozen assessments before they graduate, in some cases up to four times a year according to the Colorado Education Association. Critics say it actually means less time for overall learning.

A bipartisan measure aimed at reducing the number of tests Colorado public school students take remains in limbo at the state Legislature. The sponsors delayed the first hearing and don't know when it will be rescheduled – if at all.

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