Stacy Nick / KUNC

Despite Its Many Moves, CSU's Avenir Museum Is Focused On Preserving Our Fashion Past

Whether it's pre-Columbian burial ties from South America or a pre-millennium MC Hammer doll, you never know what you might find at Colorado State University's Avenir Museum. At the Avenir – French for "future" – the collection of more than 20,000 items of clothing and textiles aid students in directing the future of fashion by showing them the past. "In today's society, we have it so easy," said Doreen Beard, director of operations and engagement at the Avenir, which is part of CSU's Department of Design and Merchandising. "I mean, every age probably thinks that but - relatively speaking - we do. If we need a new bedspread, we go out and buy it."
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Tony Webster / Flickr - Creative Commons

Colorado Creative Industries has announced a new pilot project, named Detour, aimed at expanding tours beyond just the one-and-done show. The program will kick off with a monthlong 15-community tour by Colorado hip-hop act Flobots.

"Playing big festival shows is always a thrill, but there's something truly special about the intimacy of a small venue," Flobots lead vocalists Jonny 5 said in a news release. "It's even more special if you can find ways to meet people beforehand; to know the stories behind the faces and then watch those faces react to the show - that is the ultimate gift."

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Carol and John Wagner’s ranch is surrounded by green pastures, with spectacular views of the northern San Juan mountains. The Wagners moved here from Pennsylvania in 1986, to raise cattle. When they first arrived, Carol said they wondered what was wrong with the creek that meandered through their property.

“Nothing could live in it,” she recalled. Grass didn’t grow along its banks, and there were no fish or bugs.

That creek, called Kerber Creek, is just a small piece of the legacy left by hard rock mining across the West. When Tang-colored water spilled from a mine into the Animas River, it caught the nation’s attention. Yet unknown to most, there are people who work day in and day out cleaning up the many hundreds of abandoned mine sites across Colorado. This sort of mine cleanup work is a seldom never-ending process, fraught with logistical challenges, financing problems, even the looming threat of lawsuits.

Town of Estes Park

If you visit Estes Park, you’re part of the problem.

The town is grappling with increasing tourist traffic and parking problems, which have only gotten worse as Estes Park’s popularity has grown. Throw in 3 million annual visitors to Rocky Mountain National Park and a roadway that wasn’t designed to handle the congestion and you’ve got a big headache.

But how to fix it?

Monsanto's Messy Syngenta Courtship Comes To An End

Aug 26, 2015
Luke Runyon / KUNC and Harvest Public Media

Breaking up is a hard thing to do. It’s even harder when you’re a publicly traded, multinational seed or chemical conglomerate.

Monsanto, the St. Louis-based seed company that produces the widely-used herbicide RoundUp, had to learn that lesson the hard way. The world’s largest seed company announced Wednesday that after months of wooing, it’s no longer pursuing Switzerland-based Syngenta, the world’s largest producer of farm chemicals.

Bente Birkeland / RMCR

A program to provide long acting reversible contraceptives to low-income women has been funded for another year. About a dozen health and community foundations have stepped up to provide the funds, something the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment had been working overtime to try and secure.

Stacy Nick / KUNC

Whether it's pre-Columbian burial ties from South America or a pre-millennium MC Hammer doll, you never know what you might find at Colorado State University's Avenir Museum.

At the Avenir – French for "future" – the collection of more than 20,000 items of clothing and textiles aid students in directing the future of fashion by showing them the past.

"In today's society, we have it so easy," said Doreen Beard, director of operations and engagement at the Avenir, which is part of CSU's Department of Design and Merchandising. "I mean, every age probably thinks that but - relatively speaking - we do. If we need a new bedspread, we go out and buy it."

Organic Farmers Struggle With Stigma Of 'Dirty Fields'

Aug 26, 2015
Luke Runyon / KUNC/Harvest Public Media

While consumers might seek out organic food for its purity, organic farmers have a reputation for being anything but.

A study conducted by Southern Illinois University Carbondale found that farmers who go organic are often subject to a “weedy field bad farmer” mentality in their communities, a social stigma organic corn and soybean growers face for having mare’s tails and pigweeds poking their raggedy heads up through the neat rows of cash crops.

Researchers at the University of Minnesota found that the judgment can be so harsh, it’s an actual risk factor [.pdf] conventional farmers who are interested in transitioning to organic should consider before making the switch.

Jonathan Payne / special to KUNC

Students are heading back to school, but the road to graduation for this the incoming crop of seniors varies by high school. The reason? Unlike other states, Colorado does not have a set requirement for what it takes to receive a diploma.

Creating a standard is an ongoing debate and one that state lawmakers tried to answer in 2007 and 2008 when they approved legislation requiring a minimum statewide requirement.

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