Could A Bumblebee Learn To Play Fetch? Probably

Initially, Clint Perry wanted to make a vending machine for bumblebees. He wanted to understand how they solve problems. Perry, a cognitive biologist at Queen Mary University of London, is interested in testing the limits of animal intelligence. "I want to know: How does the brain do stuff? How does it make decisions? How does it keep memory?" says Perry. And how big does a brain need to be in order to do all of those things? He decided to test this on bumblebees by presenting the insects...

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It's that time of year: We're hiring an intern for NPR Ed! It's a great opportunity to hone your journalism chops and get a taste of what it's like in our newsroom.

Here's the problem: We get tons of applications, and lots of them are ... well, let's just say they need some work.

There was a time when a whistleblower had to rely on the Postal Service, or a pay phone, or an underground parking garage to leak to the press.

This is a different time.

A renewed interest in leaks since Donald Trump's surprise election victory last fall, and a growth in the use of end-to-end encryption technology, have led news organizations across the country to highlight the multiple high-tech ways you can now send them anonymous tips.

If you drink more alcohol than you want to or should, you're not alone. A nationwide survey by the National Institutes of Health found that 28 percent of adults in the U.S. are heavy drinkers or drink more than is recommended.

Yet, most heavy drinkers don't get the help they need.

Bente Birkeland / Capitol Coverage

“If you put an entire community in danger, that shouldn’t be a felony?” asked  Republican Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg of Sterling during a packed committee hearing on Feb. 16.

The topic of debate was Senate Bill 35, a measure that would increase the penalty for tampering with oil and equipment and attempting to interrupt operations.  Since it was first introduced, SB 35 has generated a lot of public interest. It has consistently been one of the “most accessed bills” on the state’s legislative website.

Bente Birkeland / Capitol Coverage

Recreational marijuana clubs, also called social lounges, are allowed in some Colorado communities, but state law is murky on whether or not their existence is legal and how they should be regulated. Two proposals currently moving through the legislature aim to add clarity by requiring either voters or local governments to approve the clubs.

Statehouse reporter Bente Birkeland sat down with Kristen Wyatt with the Associated Press and Luke Perkins with the Durango Herald to discuss the details.

Luke Runyon / KUNC

Colorado’s senators are under increasing pressure to hold more public meetings during Congressional breaks.

A weeklong recess from Congress took Sen. Cory Gardner up and down the Front Range, meeting with small groups and conferences in controlled settings, but the Republican from Yuma has yet to schedule an in-person town hall.

https://press.atairbnb.com/media-assets/ / Air Bnb

Home sharing services have become very popular in Colorado, and local municipalities are paying attention. Between Feb. 20 – 24, more than 1,000 notices were mailed to Denver hosts for being in violation of a city ordinance. The ordinance, passed last June, require hosts to have short-term rental licenses and collect Denver’s 10.75 percent lodging tax.

Once hosts obtain a license, they must post it on their listing in order to avoid any fines. The license fee is $25, and the fines for failing to obtain a license can range from $150 to nearly $1,000.

Sony Pictures

Maran Ade’s Toni Erdmann is one of the most genuinely and deliberately awkward movies I’ve ever seen. It has moments where the characters look like they’re frozen in place, befuddled by their situations and wondering what to do. The picture can be absurd, or ridiculous, and in its best moments it feels something like ineffable. And then, at other times, Toni Erdmann is so tender it can break your heart.

Stephanie Paige Ogburn / KUNC

The conflict over oil and gas drilling -- as well as hydraulic fracturing -- has led to multiple protests, votes and court decisions in Colorado. Most recently, Colorado Attorney General Cynthia Coffman began proceedings to sue Boulder County over its lack of new drilling permits.

But the history of oil and gas development and regulation in Colorado is a long one. Here’s how we got to where we are today.

On the eve of the vote for the next chair of the Democratic National Committee, the crowded field is thinning out.

South Carolina Democratic Chair Jaime Harrison dropped out of the race Thursday and endorsed former Labor Secretary Tom Perez. The move comes days after another candidate, New Hampshire Democratic Chair Ray Buckley, exited the race and threw his support to Rep. Keith Ellison of Minnesota.

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