Justice Antonin Scalia, Known For Biting Dissents, Dies At 79

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, perhaps the leading voice of uncompromising conservatism on the nation's highest court, was found dead Saturday, Chief Justice John Roberts has confirmed. Scalia, who had been staying at a luxury ranch in West Texas, was 79 years old."On behalf of the Court and retired Justices, I am saddened to report that our colleague Justice Antonin Scalia has passed away," Roberts said in a statement. "He was an extraordinary individual and jurist, admired and treasu...
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Verve Records

Big Bill Broonzy was an amazing guitarist and competent vocalist who went from Country Blues in the 1920s, through a period in the 1930s and 40s of urbanizing his sound to appeal to working class African-Americans, to a return to a more acoustic and folkish style in the 1950s.

In that final guise he became a hero of the 50 sand 60s American Folk music revival and an international star.

The crisis of contaminated water in Flint, Mich., is making a public health message like this one harder to get across: In most communities, the tap water is perfectly safe. And it is much healthier than sugary drinks.

That's a message that Dr. Patty Braun, a pediatrician and oral health specialist at Denver Health, spends a lot of time talking to her patients about.

Courtesy of Fort Collins Symphony

Why rent when you can own?

That’s the question the Fort Collins Symphony Orchestra is asking after spending decades renting several of its larger, more expensive instruments. In fact, the only instruments the symphony truly owns is a bass drum and a tam tam, said FCSO music director Wes Kenney.

“Anything else either belongs to (our venue), the Lincoln Center, or we're having to beg, borrow or rent it,” Kenney said.

A professional symphony renting its instruments may sound a little strange, but it’s not as uncommon as you might think.

courtesy Dog Eat Dog Films

Where to Invade Next is, of course, satirical. Michael Moore again plays the wily naïf who asks astonished, wide-eyed, innocent questions, although he is neither naïve, wide-eyed, nor innocent. It's his game; those who either love Moore or hate him know it's his game, and Moore plays it exceptionally well.

Even if half of what Moore claims in his new movie is true, the film still exposes much about who we Americans are and how we treat ourselves and others in our world.

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

The middle of winter is when the stream of locally grown fruits and vegetables in the Midwest begins to freeze up.

Nicole Saville knows first-hand. Saville is the produce manager at Open Harvest, a grocery coop in Lincoln, Neb. The store promotes food grown by local farmers, but this time of year there just isn’t much available.

“We can get kale and some culinary herbs this time of year,” Saville said. “Otherwise the only other local option is a soil mix in our garden center.”

That means the bunches of carrots, bags of onions, and piles of pears on shelves from Lincoln, Nebraska, to Ames, Iowa, to Columbia, Missouri, made a long trip to get there.

courtesy of the Loveland Chamber of Commerce

Almost everyone who lives in Northern Colorado has probably heard of Loveland's Valentine remailing program. The U.S. Postal Service says the program, which turns 70 in 2016, is the largest of its kind in the country, handling between 150,000 and 200,000 pieces of mail each year.

Beginning as early as December, cards and letters start pouring in from all over the world. For about two weeks before Valentine’s Day, the sound of stamping fills the Loveland Chamber of Commerce.

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