6:41am

Wed October 1, 2014

6:30am

Wed October 1, 2014
Politics

No Matter How Colorado Votes, GMO Labeling Debate Far From Finished

"I'm a label reader," says Denver resident Ben Hamilton. He sat on a citizen panel tasked with writing a report on proposition 105, which would require the labeling of foods that contain genetically modified ingredients.
Luke Runyon KUNC and Harvest Public Media

Voters in Colorado will decide whether or not they want the state to require labels on foods containing genetically modified ingredients, or GMOs. The 2014 ballot measure highlights a much larger national conversation about the safety and prevalence of genetically modified foods.

If passed, food companies and farmers would need to affix on a food label the text: "Produced with genetic engineering" if the product contains certain genetically modified crops and their derived oils and sugars that end up in processed foods. Those in favor of the proposal, Proposition 105, claim consumers have a right to the information. Those opposed say it amounts to a fear campaign.

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1:34pm

Tue September 30, 2014
Wildlife

Saving Sagebrush Helps More Than Grouse: Deer, Local Economy Benefit Too

Mule deer bucks in velvet Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge, also greater sage grouse habitat.
Tom Koerner U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Rolling sagebrush-covered foothills may seem like an almost commonplace symbol of the American West, but the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service calls it "one of the most imperiled ecosystems in America," threatened and fragmented by invasive species, wildfire, and development.

Loss of quality habitat has led to steep declines in the numbers of greater sage grouse, a bird that lives and breeds in the sagebrush. Because of this, many Western states are working on plans to improve and preserve the sagebrush steppe the birds rely on. Now, two new studies show that saving sagebrush can benefit more than just the grouse.

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1:12pm

Tue September 30, 2014
Emerald Ash Borer

Officials Introduce Ash Borer Parasite To Stem Boulder Infestation

An adult Tetrastichus wasp.
Credit Colorado Deptartment of Agriculture / APHIS

Agriculture officials are introducing stingless, parasitic wasps from Asia in an effort to control another non-native insect – the Emerald Ash Borer.

The tiny wasps (Tetrastichus Planipennisi) are a natural parasite of the invasive beetle, native to Asia,that has decimated the ash tree population across the U.S. EAB was found in the city of Boulder in 2013, the furthest west it has yet been found.

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9:32am

Tue September 30, 2014
Community

Embrace The Gut Churn With Radiolab's Jad Abumrad

Jad Abumrad is coming to Fort Collins & Boulder

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