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5:55am

Sun December 11, 2011
Media

In Time Of Need, Romney Turns To Media

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has a newfound eagerness to talk to reporters — some of them, at least.

To hear Romney tell it, you'd think he had always welcomed the press corps.

"You're going to see me all over the country, particularly in early primary states," Romney said last week to Fox News host Neil Cavuto. "I'll be on TV — I'll be on Fox a lot because you guys matter when it comes to Republican primary voters. I want them to hear my message and have an opportunity to make their choice."

Off Mic, On Script

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5:38am

Sun December 11, 2011
Politics

Arguing Over A Tax Cut Nobody Notices

Congress and the White House continue to debate the future of a 2-percent payroll tax cut that expires at the end of the year. While both Republicans and Democrats appear interested in extending the break, party leaders have been squabbling over details.

Democrats blocked a Republican proposal to tie an extension to speeding up approval of the controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline.

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4:11am

Sun December 11, 2011
Music Interviews

Miracles Of Modern Science: No Guitars Necessary

Miracles of Modern Science are a rock group with a love of jazz and chamber pop — and no need for a guitar. The band's debut album is called Dog Year.
Courtesy of the artist

A lot of rock bands visit the NPR studios with maybe a fiddle or two in tow. But Miracles of Modern Science are not a typical rock band. the group boasts a mandolin, upright bass, cello, violin, drums — and absolutely no electric guitar.

Evan Younger, Josh Hirshfeld, Kieran Ledwidge, Tyler Pines and Geoff McDonald met in college, where they bonded over a shared love of jazz, rock and classical music. But even more important to their chemistry, McDonald says, is a belief that those genres can play nice together, with satisfying results.

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4:04am

Sun December 11, 2011
Living Large: Obesity In America

Spandex Stretches To Meet U.S. Waistlines

Originally published on Wed August 1, 2012 4:44 pm

Ed Gribbin, head of Alvanon, says spandex is a "democratic" fiber because it morphs to the body as opposed to limiting it.
Marisa Penaloza NPR

Part of an ongoing series on obesity in America

When you think of spandex, 1970s disco mania may come to mind. Spandex came off the dance floor and into everyone's closet — stretchy leggings, jumpsuits and leg warmers were the rage. But spandex had a life before disco. It was invented by two DuPont chemists. It made its debut in 1959, first used in bras and jockstraps, as well as in workout gear.

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4:04am

Sun December 11, 2011
Living Large: Obesity In America

From Body Scan To Body Form: Sizing A Clothing Line

Originally published on Wed August 1, 2012 4:44 pm

Alvanon is the largest maker of mannequin body forms in the world. The Manhattan-based company uses a device called AlvaScan to create these forms — which are then used to create clothing sizes. "We are so diverse that in any given size, there are probably four or six different body types that are represented," says the company's president, Ed Gribbin.
Courtesy of Alvanon

Are you size 4? A 6? An 8? Often women shoppers don't know. And they can actually be all those sizes without gaining or losing an ounce.

Ed Gribbin, president of Alvanon, a clothing size and fit consulting firm in New York City, says everyone has a number in their head. When you go shopping, you instinctively look for your size, but more often than not, the item doesn't fit.

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