Carrie Kahn

Carrie Kahn is a correspondent for NPR's National Desk based at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Kahn's reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning news programs including All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

Kahn has frequently worked on assignment for NPR throughout Mexico, California and the West. In 2005, Kahn was part of NPR’s extensive coverage of Hurricane Katrina, where she investigated claims of euthanasia in New Orleans hospitals, recovery efforts along the Gulf Coast and resettlement of city residents in Houston, TX. She has covered her share of Hurricanes since, fire storms and mudslides in Southern California and the controversial life and death of pop-icon Michael Jackson. Kahn continues to cover immigration and immigrant communities throughout the country, as well as drug trafficking and border enforcement along the U.S.-Mexico border. In 2008, as China hosted the world’s athletes, Kahn recorded a remembrance of her Jewish grandfather and his decision to compete in Hitler’s 1936 Olympics.

Before coming to NPR in 2004, Kahn worked for 2 1/2 years at NPR station KQED in San Francisco, first as an editor and then as a general assignment reporter with a focus on immigration reporting. From 1994 to 2001, Kahn was the border and community affairs reporter at NPR station KPBS in San Diego, where she covered immigration, cross-border issues and the city's ethnic communities.

While at KPBS, Kahn received numerous awards, including back-to-back Sol Price Awards for Responsible Journalism from the Society of Professional Journalists. She won the California/Nevada Associated Press award for Best News Feature, eight Golden Mike Awards from the Radio & TV News Association of Southern California and numerous prizes from the San Diego Press Club and the Society of Professional Journalists of San Diego. She was also awarded three consecutive La Pluma Awards from the California Chicano News Media Association.

Prior to joining KPBS, Kahn worked for NPR station KUSP and published a bilingual community newspaper in Santa Cruz, CA.

Kahn is frequently called upon to lecture or discuss border issues and bi-national journalism. Her work has been cited for fairness and balance by the Poynter Institute of Media Studies. She was awarded and completed a Pew Fellowship in International Journalism at Johns Hopkins University.

Born and raised in Los Angeles, Kahn received a Bachelors degree from UC Santa Cruz in Biology. For several years she was a human genetics researcher in California and in Costa Rica. She has traveled extensively throughout Mexico, Central America, Europe and the Middle East, where she worked on a English/Hebrew/Arabic magazine.

Carrie lives somewhat close to the beach in Los Angeles and loves to go for runs near the shore with her husband, two girls and their cockapoo Mona.

 

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4:32am

Sat June 8, 2013
Latin America

Extortion Common For Latin American Businesses

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 11:16 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Latin America has some of the highest crime rates in the world. And that includes extortion, which doesn't just terrorize but also takes a huge economic toll on ordinary citizens. In many Latin American countries, it's costing billions of dollars and hindering development. As part of our series on violence in Latin America, NPR's Carrie Kahn takes us to Mexico, where some estimates say extortion costs more than $30 billion a year. [POST-BROADCAST CORRECTION: Extortion costs an estimated $3.2 billion in Mexico annually.]

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4:52am

Sun June 2, 2013
Latin America

Rare Gang Truce Disrupts Violence In Honduras

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 1:41 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

When you think of the most dangerous places in the world, Syria or Afghanistan might come to mind. But Honduras has the highest murder rate in the world. Nearly 40 percent of the cocaine consumed globally passes through its borders. And the Central American country is home to thousands of gang members, many of whom got their start on U.S. city streets. Last week though, there was a hopeful development suggesting even the most hardened criminals may have had enough.

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3:15pm

Mon May 13, 2013
Parallels

As Stigma Eases, Single Motherhood In Mexico Is On The Rise

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 5:25 pm

Maria Carlotta Santa Maria is a single mother in Mexico and is the sole wage earner in her household. Women like her are becoming more common there, and the stigma once associated with having children out of wedlock is fading.
Carrie Kahn NPR

On her daily route delivering laundry in her working-class neighborhood in southern Mexico City, Maria Carlotta Santa Maria, or Mari, as she is known, seems to know everyone: the mailman, the woman on the corner selling salty nuts, and her favorite greetings are for the guys at the corner gas station.

Mari is the kind of person that can make this inhospitable and overwhelming megacity seem almost small and friendly. But as a single mother, she says raising her 10-year-old daughter Jimena alone hasn't been easy.

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5:23pm

Fri May 10, 2013
Latin America

Former Guatemalan Dictator Found Guilty Of Genocide

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Guilty of genocide and crimes against humanity, that's the verdict today against Efrain Rios Montt, a former dictator of Guatemala. The general ruled the Central American nation in the early 1980s, one of the bloodiest periods of its 36-year-long civil war. Rios Montt, now 86 years old, was found responsible for atrocities committed against the Maya Ixil indigenous group. NPR's Carrie Kahn reports.

CARRIE KAHN, BYLINE: Presiding Judge Yasmin Barrios read the verdict to a packed audience in the expansive Supreme Court auditorium.

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3:51am

Sat May 4, 2013
Latin America

On Mexico Trip, Obama Maintains Economic Focus

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 9:53 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. President Obama is in Costa Rica today. He's talking with leaders of Central American nations about security and economic trade. Yesterday, the president wrapped up a two-day visit in Mexico, where he tried to steer the focus away from contentious issues like immigration and drug violence. NPR's Carrie Kahn reports from Mexico City.

CARRIE KAHN, BYLINE: During their quick visit, Presidents Obama and Pena Nieto stuck to their focus: the economy.

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