Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

NPR correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro is most at home when she's on the move. Born in London, the journalist has lived in the United States, Colombia, Afghanistan, Israel and Mexico City. She currently covers the Middle East for NPR, and is based in Jerusalem.

After covering Iraq as NPR News' Baghdad Bureau Chief since February 2008, Garcia-Navarro made another move: relocating to Israel in April 2009 to become NPR's correspondent based in Jerusalem.

Prior to reporting from Baghdad, Garcia-Navarro spent three years as NPR's foreign correspondent in Mexico City, reporting from that region as well as on special assignments abroad. Her depth of reporting brought an insider's cultivated perspective to a territory that also embraces her family's roots (incidentally, her parents are from the region).

Garcia-Navarro got her start in journalism as a freelancer with the BBC World Service and Voice of America, reporting from Cuba, Syria, Panama and Europe. She later became a producer for Associated Press Television News (APTN) before transitioning to AP Radio. While there, Garcia-Navarro covered post-Sept. 11 events in Afghanistan and developments in Jerusalem. From 2002 to 2004, she was based in Iraq.

Why journalism? Garcia-Navarro says that she likes "to tell people's stories, to make their lives real and vivid," adding that it's "an important job and I love doing it."

Garcia-Navarro holds a B.S. in International Relations from Georgetown University and an M.A. in journalism from City University in London. She was the recipient of the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize in 2006 for a two-part series "Migrants' Job Search Empties Mexican Community," and also shared in two awards honoring NPR News' Iraq reporting: a Peabody Award in 2005, and a 2007 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton Award.

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2:00am

Mon October 3, 2011
Africa

Anti-Gadhafi Loyalists Accused Of Abusing Power

Residents of the Libyan capital Tripoli are growing increasingly angry at abuses said to be carried out by armed anti-Gadhafi groups. Some allege that once rebel fighting brigades have become criminal gangs, looting and intimidating at will.

1:00pm

Fri September 16, 2011
World

Abbas Plans To Ask U.N. For Palestinian Statehood

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas announces that he will present the Palestinian bid for statehood recognition directly to the U.N. Security Council next week. This, despite the threat of a U.S. veto. Abbas said U.N. recognition of a state on territory seized by Israel in the 1967 Six-Day War will allow the Palestinians to negotiate with Israel as equals.

3:21pm

Thu September 15, 2011
Middle East

Changing Middle East Leaves Israel Feeling Isolated

Egyptian soldiers guard the badly damaged entrance of the Israeli Embassy in Cairo, Egypt on Sunday. Protesters stormed the embassy, contributing to the worst diplomatic crisis between the two countries since they signed a peace treaty in 1979.
Nasser Nasser AP

Turkish leader Recep Tayyip Erdogan would seem to be an unlikely icon for the Palestinians. Yet he is all the rage these days in the Palestinian territories. His picture is everywhere, even in places you would never expect it.

"All your receipts, all your notepads, everything has the picture of Erdogan," says Abdul Rahman Marra, a grocery store owner in the West Bank.

Mara then gestures to the posters of Erdogan on the walls. The Turkish leader stood up to Israel and defended Palestinian rights, Marra says, calling Erdogan the best leader in the Muslim world.

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2:51pm

Wed August 31, 2011
Conflict In Libya

In Tripoli, Celebrating More Than Ramadan's End

Muslims gather at Martyr's Square in Tripoli for Eid prayers Wednesday. Despite joy over the rebel takeover of the city, residents still face water and electricity shortages and high food prices.
Daniel Berehulak Getty Images

The Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr is always a time of joyous celebration in the Islamic world. The holiday's arrival means that Ramadan, the long month of daytime fasting, is over, and friends and family gather to exchange gifts and share meals.

As it began Wednesday in Tripoli, the holiday carried even greater resonance this year because of the rebel takeover of the Libyan capital.

"It's the big Eid this year," says resident Alaa al-Najaa. "In my life, I haven't seen the people before like that, especially the children."

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2:00am

Mon August 29, 2011
Africa

Libyan Rebels Use Upper Hand Over Gadhafi Loyalists

In Libya, the tide has turned against Moammar Gadhafi and his supporters. And that has left an uncomfortable question for the new rebel authority: What to do with his loyalists and supporters?

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