Ron Elving

Ron Elving is the NPR News' Senior Washington Editor directing coverage of the nation's capital and national politics and providing on-air political analysis for many NPR programs.

Elving can regularly be heard on Talk of the Nation providing analysis of the latest in politics. He is also heard on the "It's All Politics" weekly podcast along with NPR's Ken Rudin.

Under Elving's leadership, NPR has been awarded the industry's top honors for political coverage including the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a 2002 duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for excellence in broadcast journalism, the Merriman Smith Award for White House reporting from the White House Correspondents Association and the Barone Award from the Radio and Television Correspondents Association. In 2008, the American Political Science Association awarded NPR the Carey McWilliams Award "in recognition of a major contribution to the understanding of political science."

Before joining NPR in 1999, Elving served as political editor for USA Today and for Congressional Quarterly. He came to Washington in 1984 as a Congressional Fellow with the American Political Science Association and worked for two years as a staff member in the House and Senate. Previously, Elving served as a reporter and state capital bureau chief for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. He was a media fellow at Stanford University and the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Over his career, Elving has written articles published by The Washington Post, the Brookings Institution, Columbia Journalism Review, Media Studies Journal, and the American Political Science Association. He was a contributor and editor for eight reference works published by Congressional Quarterly Books from 1990 to 2003. His book, Conflict and Compromise: How Congress Makes the Law, was published by Simon & Schuster in 1995. Recently, Elving contributed the chapter, "Fall of the Favorite: Obama and the Media," to James Thurber's Obama in Office: The First Two Years.

Elving teaches public policy in the school of Public Administration at George Mason University and has also taught at Georgetown University, American University and Marquette University.

With an bachelor's degree from Stanford, Elving went on to earn master's degrees from the University of Chicago and the University of California-Berkeley.

Pages

3:21am

Fri April 24, 2015
It's All Politics

Has The Senate Found It's More Fun To Be Functional?

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 10:27 am

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., (left) and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., at a ceremony last month at the U.S. Capitol.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Loretta Lynch's confirmation as Attorney General was not the only sign of a spring thaw in the Senate this week: Senators also voted for a crackdown on human trafficking, while green shoots of compromise seemed to sprout on other contentious issues, both foreign and domestic.

Read more

2:34pm

Thu March 12, 2015
Politics

Hillary Clinton Renews Tradition Of Trial By News Conference

Originally published on Thu March 12, 2015 4:43 pm

Former Secretary of State and likely 2016 presidential candidate Hillary Clinton faces the media Tuesday over her use of a private server and email account she used to conduct public business.
Richard Drew AP

In the days ahead, strenuous efforts will be made to prove or disprove the assertions Hillary Clinton made in her news conference Tuesday regarding her email accounts. The fate of Clinton's presumed presidential candidacy will depend on that struggle.

Or not.

In past presidential cycles we have seen many a news conference where careers on the national stage seemed to hang in the balance. Some of these moments have led to redemption, others to utter disaster. And still others have proved inconclusive, with other factors determining the candidate's fate.

Read more

8:17am

Wed February 25, 2015
Politics

6 Years On, Is The Tea Party Here To Stay?

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 12:22 pm

Tea Party supporter William Temple protests against President Obama's health care law outside the Supreme Court in 2012.
David Goldman AP

It was February of 2009. President Obama had been in office less than a full month. His approval rating was over 60, and nearly 60 percent of the House and Senate seats were held by Democrats. The country seem poised on the edge of a new era, perhaps even another New Deal.

Read more

5:25am

Wed January 21, 2015
It's All Politics

Obama State Of The Union Seeks To 'Turn The Page' To A Brighter Chapter

Mandel Ngan AP

In the first minute of his hourlong State of the Union address, President Barack Obama summed up his theme in single sentence: "Tonight, we turn the page."

The president then detailed a page of history filled with the financial crisis of 2008, the recession and unemployment and deficits that followed and the two distant and difficult wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

It was a reminder of the ills that helped elevate young Sen. Obama to the Oval Office six years ago. And now, after many battles, he was ready to declare he had turned that page.

Read more

5:50am

Sat January 10, 2015
It's All Politics

5 Signs We're Not In Post-Partisan Paradise Yet

Originally published on Sat January 10, 2015 8:11 am

Speaker John Boehner is handed the gavel by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi after being re-elected for a third term to lead the 114th Congress.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

If you follow the latest fashions in Washington politics, you've surely noticed the new look for 2015. It's all about "showing we can govern" and putting the flamboyant partisan stylings of past years behind us.

Unfortunately, this week the new political season opened in Washington, and that latest theme took a pratfall as soon as it reached the runway. All the cheery holiday talk about consensus and working together seemed forgotten overnight.

Read more

Pages