All Things Considered

Weekday Evenings 2-3, 3:30 - 5:30, & 6-7
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, Audie Cornish
Jackie Fortier

Breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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3:33pm

Fri July 25, 2014
Movie Interviews

In Which Colin Firth Debunks Some Myths About Working With Woody Allen

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 5:40 pm

Woody Allen directs --€“ that's right, directs --€” Colin Firth and Emma Stone in Magic in the Moonlight.
Jack English Sony Pictures Classics

In Magic in the Moonlight, a new film from Woody Allen, Colin Firth plays a 1920s stage magician who is also an expert at debunking spiritualists. Stanley, Firth's character, takes on the case of a young woman, played by Emma Stone, who is a supposedly adept medium.

Firth tells NPR's Robert Siegel how some of the more well-known myths about working will Allen checked out, and why he's been appearing in fewer comedies.

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2:47pm

Fri July 25, 2014
Politics

As Political Disenchantment Soars, Lines At The Polls Grow Shorter

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 5:40 pm

An official assists a voter at a polling station inside Fort Garrison Elementary School in Pikesville, Md., on primary day, June 24. As in many states this primary election season, turnout was low in Maryland.
Patrick Semansky AP

Several new surveys show voter interest is low, anti-incumbent sentiment is high, and voters from both parties are questioning whether their elected leaders should return to Congress next year.

In short, the electorate is disengaged and disgusted with politics.

Voter turnout in the 2010 primaries was only about 18 percent, and now it's even lower. Less than 15 percent of eligible citizens cast ballots in the 25 states that have held statewide primaries this year, according to a new report from the Center for the Study of the American Electorate.

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2:45pm

Fri July 25, 2014
The Salt

Can Finishing A Big Bowl Of Ramen Make Dreams Come True?

Originally published on Sat July 26, 2014 8:48 am

At Yume Wo Katare, eating ramen is treated as a path to personal fulfillment.
Andrea Shea for WBUR

You can find ramen, the Japanese noodle soup that's meant to be slurped, almost anywhere in the U.S. these days. Ramen shops continue to pop up, and you can find renditions on the menus of restaurants and gastropubs.

But there's a truly funky noodle spot in Cambridge called Yume Wo Katare that serves more than just ramen.

There aren't many restaurants where you get praised by everyone around you for clearing your plate or bowl. But that's exactly what happens at Yume Wo Katare.

"Everyone, he did a good job!"

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2:45pm

Fri July 25, 2014
This Week's Must Read

Fiction Explores The Push And Pull Of Arab-Israeli Identity

Originally published on Fri July 25, 2014 5:40 pm

To be an Arab living in Israel proper has long been a challenging proposition. Even sussing out what to call them has political implications: Arab Israelis? Israeli Arabs? Palestinian Israelis? Or maybe just Palestinians? Arabs in Israel live lives that constantly — often stressfully — straddle two cultures: They are all at once ethnically Arab and citizens of the Jewish state.

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2:45pm

Fri July 25, 2014
Shots - Health News

How Well Does A Drug Work? Look Beyond The Fine Print

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 8:47 am

Traditional warning labels on medicine boxes tend to be long on confusing language, critics say, but short on helpful numbers.
iStockphoto

Anybody who has ever seen a drug advertisement or talked over the pros and cons of a medicine with a doctor can be forgiven for being confused.

Sorting out the risks and benefits of taking a medicine can be complicated even for professionals.

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