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3:00am

Mon July 28, 2014
Shots - Health News

Why We Think Ignorance Is Bliss, Even When It Hurts Our Health

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 11:52 am

Lucinda Schreiber for NPR

Medical tests are rarely a pleasant experience, especially if you're worried that something could be seriously wrong. That's true even though we know that regular screenings and tests often help doctors catch issues early.

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3:00am

Mon July 28, 2014
Shots - Health News

New York Debates Whether Housing Counts As Health Care

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 11:52 am

Lissette Encarnacion in her apartment at The Brook, a supportive housing complex in the New York City borough of the Bronx.
Natalie Fertig WNYC

Standing outside her sixth-floor apartment in the Bronx, Lissette Encarnacion says she sometimes forgets the place belongs to her.

"I'm thinking I'm at somebody else's [house]," she says. "I'm ringing my own doorbell."

Encarnacion used to have a career in banking, and lived in a real home with her son and husband. Then one night everything changed, she says, when her husband came home drunk and angry, and threw her off a balcony.

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3:00am

Mon July 28, 2014
Law

When Did Companies Become People? Excavating The Legal Evolution

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 11:52 am

Volunteers at the Lincoln Memorial help roll up a giant banner printed with the Preamble to the Constitution during an October 2010 demonstration against the Supreme Court's Citizens United ruling.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Are corporations people? The U.S. Supreme Court says they are, at least for some purposes. And in the past four years, the high court has dramatically expanded corporate rights.

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3:00am

Mon July 28, 2014
Deceptive Cadence

The Great War At 100: Music Of Conflict And Remembrance

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 12:37 pm

Austrian pianist Paul Wittgenstein (who later became an American citizen) lost an arm in World War I. He commissioned composers including Maurice Ravel to write pieces for the left hand alone.
Bettmann/CORBIS

One hundred years ago today, the Austro-Hungarian Empire declared war on Serbia. The conflict drew in country after country and grew to an unprecedented scale. An estimated 9 million combatants lost their lives and more than 21 million were wounded in what came to be known as The Great War and, eventually, World War I.

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3:00am

Mon July 28, 2014
Science

Shifts In Habitat May Threaten Ruddy Shorebird's Survival

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 11:52 am

Guided by biologists, volunteers briefly catch, band and release some of Delaware's visiting red knots each spring to monitor the health of the species.
Maggie Starbard NPR

An intrepid bird called the red knot migrates from the southern tip of South America to the Arctic and back every year. But changes in climate along its route are putting this ultramarathoner at risk.

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