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3:16am

Tue September 16, 2014
Goats and Soda

Hiccups Were The Clue That Led Researchers To Ebola

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 8:05 am

Red Cross health workers wearing protective suits in Conakry, Guinea, on Sunday.
Cellou Binani AFP/Getty Images

The Ebola virus had been circulating in Guinea for roughly three months before doctors and international aid organizations finally detected it.

It was hiccups that eventually gave it away, journalist Jeffrey Stern wrote in Vanity Fair this weekend.

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3:16am

Tue September 16, 2014
Business

GM Ignition-Switch Defect Now Linked To 19 Deaths

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 9:03 am

Kenneth Feinberg, who is administrating a crash victims fund, testified before a Senate commerce subcommittee hearing in July that was examining accountability and corporate culture following GM recalls.
Lauren Victoria Burke AP

A special compensation fund for victims of GM's faulty ignition switch has issued its first report, and it makes clear that GM will pay claims for more than the 13 deaths the automaker says were linked to the defect.

GM established the voluntary compensation fund as part of its ongoing mea culpa for delaying an ignition switch recall for a decade.

The program is only for Cobalts, HHRs, Saturn Ions and a few other GM models, all no longer in production, and only for those killed or injured when their airbags did not deploy because the ignition switch had turned off.

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3:16am

Tue September 16, 2014
Goats and Soda

Obama To Announce Buildup In U.S. Efforts To Fight Ebola

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 7:43 am

Workers unload medical supplies to fight the Ebola epidemic from a USAID cargo flight in Harbel, Liberia, in August.
John Moore Getty Images

The Ebola epidemic in West Africa is already the deadliest on record, having killed more than 2,400 people. Health experts warn it could get much worse, if the spread of the disease isn't contained quickly.

That alarm has President Obama meeting today with experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Obama is expected to announce a major buildup in U.S. efforts to address the threat of Ebola.

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1:41am

Tue September 16, 2014
Planet Money

Minecraft's Business Model: A Video Game That Leaves You Alone

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 1:32 pm

Will Davidson and his Minecraft creation, modeled off the Santa Cruz Mission
Steve Henn

Minecraft is deceptively simple video game. You're dropped into a virtual world, and you get to build things. It's like a digital Lego set, but with infinite pieces.

It's simplicity makes it a big hit with kids, like 10-year old Will Davidson. Last year, Will built a Spanish mission for a school report. He modeled his off the Santa Cruz Mission. "I made a chapel over here," Davidson says. "I also have a bell tower."

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1:38am

Tue September 16, 2014
Shots - Health News

Too Few University Jobs For America's Young Scientists

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 2:23 pm

Victoria Ruiz (left), a postdoctoral fellow in immunology, works with Brianna Delgado, a high school student that she mentors, at the Blaser Lab, inside NYU's Langone Medical Center in New York, NY.
Ramsay de Give for NPR

Imagine a job where about half of all the work is being done by people who are in training. That's, in fact, what happens in the world of biological and medical research.

In the United States, more than 40,000 temporary employees known as postdoctoral research fellows are doing science at a bargain price. And most postdocs are being trained for jobs that don't actually exist.

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