National

6:31am

Fri May 4, 2012

5:10am

Fri May 4, 2012

1:00am

Fri May 4, 2012
National Security

Potential Torture Testimony Could Rattle Sept. 11 Case

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 10:02 am

A picture posted on the website www.muslm.net in 2009 allegedly shows al-Qaida's Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, who has claimed to be the mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks, at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp.
AFP/Getty Images

The man who claims to have orchestrated the Sept. 11 attacks is expected to appear in a military courtroom this Saturday. Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four other men are supposed to answer formal charges related to their roles in the plot.

Their arraignment will be at Guantanamo Bay, and it is the first step that leads — possibly years from now — to a military trial.

Read more

2:11pm

Thu May 3, 2012
The Two-Way

Student Forgotten In Holding Cell: 'Changes Have To Be Made'

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 8:43 am

Daniel Chong appears at a news conference on Tuesday in San Diego.
K. C. Alfred UT San Diego

Daniel Chong, a California college senior, was forgotten in a federal holding cell without food or water for five days.

Today, he told All Things Considered's Audie Cornish that the five days tested his sanity and his resolve to live.

"I didn't stay sane," Chong said. "Eventually, by the second or third night ... I went completely insane and was just trying to get a grip on reality, on what's happening to me."

Chong said at one point he thought about using his glasses to cut into his arm and kill himself.

Read more
Tags: 

12:14pm

Thu May 3, 2012
Religion

Nuns And The Vatican: A Clash Decades In Making

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 2:42 pm

American nuns attend Mass at Sant'Apollinare in Rome. The umbrella group that represents the majority of the approximately 56,000 U.S. nuns plans to meet later this month to discuss its response to a Vatican reprimand.
Andrew Medichini AP

When Harvard divinity professor Harvey Cox arranged to meet with Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger at the Vatican in 1988, a group of nuns thought he was wasting his time.

"I was chatting and having dinner with a number of Dominican sisters who were staying there for a 30-day retreat," Cox says. "They were incredulous that I wanted to bother seeing Ratzinger. 'Why do you want to do that?' they asked. 'Who pays any attention to him?' "

Flash forward a few decades, and nuns are more than paying attention.

Read more

Pages