National

11:57am

Sat April 20, 2013
Around the Nation

Witness To A Manhunt In Your Own Backyard

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Back now to our coverage of the tense night and police activity that brought an end to the manhunt for the second Boston Marathon bombing suspect. Franklin Street in Watertown was the epicenter of that massive search. Police and SWAT teams took over the suburban neighborhood looking for 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Keith Glavish lives nearby. He was in his house while the search unfolded. Thanks for being with us.

KEITH GLAVISH: Good morning.

SIMON: Quiet again?

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11:57am

Sat April 20, 2013
Around the Nation

In Boston, The Search For Answers Begins

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

People who knew Dzhokhar Tsarnaev just have a hard time squaring the man they knew, with the violence in Boston. Sierra Schwartz went to Cambridge Rindge and Latin high school with the suspect, who's now in custody.

SIERRA SCHWARTZ: The Dzhokhar that I knew at the time was friendly, quiet but not in a - alarming way. He was just - you know, soft-spoken but very - you know, funny, very sweet, wouldn't harm a fly; someone that you would want to talk to.

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8:46am

Sat April 20, 2013
The Two-Way

A Thank You To Al Neuharth, Founder Of 'USA Today'

Al Neuharth, founder of USA Today and former CEO of Gannett Co.
Roger L. Wollenberg UPI/Reuters

Al Neuharth died Friday at his home in Cocoa Beach, Fla.

He was 89.

Al's name may not be familiar to you, but this blogger hopes that you are acquainted with the newspaper he willed to life in 1982: USA Today.

From 1984 to 2009, I was either a reporter or editor — and sometimes both — at McPaper (a nickname that critics bestowed upon USA Today, but which those of us who were there in its best days adopted with the pride of underdogs).

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7:16am

Sat April 20, 2013
NPR Story

Boston: A Real-World Test Of Homeland Security

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 3:57 pm

An armored vehicle is driven near Mount Auburn and Melendy streets in Watertown.
Essdras M Suarez Boston Globe via Getty Images

The Boston Marathon's medical tent last Monday was filled with exhausted and dehydrated runners, but the atmosphere had started to turn festive as the race wound down.

Then the bombs went off.

"The first patients you see are a double amputee and this woman they were doing compressions on," says Emi Larsen, a nurse who volunteered at the tent. "It was sheer panic."

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5:41am

Sat April 20, 2013
National Security

U.S.-Russia Relations Highlighted In Bombing Aftermath

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 11:57 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Tracing the Tsarnaev family roots back to Russia is going to require cooperation between Washington, D.C., and Moscow and of course, as we just heard, this comes at a frosty time in relations between the two countries. NPR's diplomatic correspondent Michele Kelemen joins us. Thanks for being with us.

MICHELE KELEMEN, BYLINE: Thanks, Scott.

SIMON: And first, any signs of cooperation so far?

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