Tuition

2:12pm

Sun February 17, 2013

2:42am

Wed December 5, 2012
NPR Story

Cooper Union Students Protest Threat To Free Tuition

Originally published on Wed December 5, 2012 7:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And a student occupation is entering its third day in New York City. It's happening at Cooper Union. The school of art, architecture and engineering is famous for not charging undergraduates tuition.

As NPR's Joel Rose reports, student protesters are unhappy about what they see as threats to that tradition.

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2:25pm

Tue November 27, 2012
Education

As Colleges Retool Aid, Can Entry Stay Need-Blind?

Originally published on Wed November 28, 2012 3:23 pm

Cornell University just converted some of its grants into loans.
iStockphoto.com

With money coming in more slowly than the financial aid given out, schools say they are nearing the breaking point, and even the most selective elite universities are rethinking their generosity.

"It just became clear that if we continue to give more and more aid, the numbers don't add up," says Raynard Kington, head of Grinnell College. Thanks to longtime former board member Warren Buffett, Grinnell has an endowment bigger than most schools dream of. For years, that's enabled Grinnell to admit students on a need-blind basis — and then give them as much aid as they need.

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3:06pm

Thu October 11, 2012
Solve This

Obama, Romney on Higher Ed Help: Dueling Visions

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 3:13 pm

Gan Golan holds a ball and chain representing his college loan debt during at a Occupy DC event last year.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Many Americans today feel like they've lost or are losing their shot at a college education because paying for it often seems out of reach. So how big of an issue is this in the presidential campaign?

Here's what President Obama has done to help families pay for college: He negotiated a deal with Congress this summer that kept the interest rate on government-backed Stafford loans from doubling for 7.5 million students.

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6:34am

Thu October 11, 2012
Planet Money

College Costs More In America, But The Payoff Is Bigger

Originally published on Wed October 17, 2012 9:38 am

Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

Students pay much more for a college education in the U.S. than they do in most other countries. But they also get a bigger return on their investment.

Here's a graphical breakdown comparing the cost and the payoff for a college education.

A few notes:

The data come from a recently published OECD report looking at educational data around the world. The cost of education includes tuition fees and living costs paid by the student, as well as earnings that students forgo by not working while they're in school.

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