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Search For Jimmy Hoffa Leads To Driveway Near Detroit

What lies beneath? The driveway in Roseville, Mich., where soil samples will be taken to see if human remains — possibly Jimmy Hoffa's — are buried there.
Kimberly P. Mitchell
/
MCT /Landov
What lies beneath? The driveway in Roseville, Mich., where soil samples will be taken to see if human remains — possibly Jimmy Hoffa's — are buried there.

The 37-year-old search for Teamsters boss Jimmy Hoffa moves to a driveway in Roseville, Mich., on Friday.

"Police will be taking soil core samples," theDetroit Free Press reports, after receiving what they say is a "credible" tip that around the time of Hoffa's 1975 disappearance someone was buried under what's now a driveway in a Roseville residential neighborhood.

As the newspaper reminds its readers, "Hoffa, 62, disappeared on the afternoon of July 30, 1975, from the parking lot of what then was the Machus Red Fox restaurant in Bloomfield Township."

A little bit of mapquesting tells us that Roseville is 25-30 miles from Bloomfield Township.

Of course, authorities have been following tips and digging up possible burial sites for several decades now — and still don't know what happened to Hoffa.

And Roseville Police Chief James Berlin says the timeline related to the tip and the possible body in his town may not quite add up.

But if Hoffa's remains are found in Michigan — not under what once was Giants Stadium hundreds of miles away — that will bring an end to one of New Jersey's "enduring themes," says John Brennan at NorthJersey.com's Meadowlands Matters blog.

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Mark Memmott is NPR's supervising senior editor for Standards & Practices. In that role, he's a resource for NPR's journalists – helping them raise the right questions as they do their work and uphold the organization's standards.
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