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International Monetary Fund (IMF)

  • Christine Lagarde says giving women access to the job market isn't just about equal opportunity — it makes economic sense. In an interview, she also reflects on being the only woman in the room.
  • Egypt desperately needs foreign assistance to keep its economy from collapsing. The country's neighbors have been stepping up, dwarfing U.S. economic aid since the fall of Hosni Mubarak in 2011. To discuss Egypt's immediate financial issues, Renee Montagne talks to Mohsin Khan, a senior fellow at the Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East at the Atlantic Council and the former director of the Middle East Department at the International Monetary Fund.
  • In a report, the International Monetary Fund said Greece's recession and unemployment problems were more severe than anticipated. But the report added that the overall bailout was a success because it prevented the country's economic troubles from spilling over to the rest of Europe.
  • Drivers will find this summer's gas prices are lower than last year's, the result of a spike in crude oil production. Government forecasters say a gallon of regular gasoline will cost about $3.50 this summer — a slide of more than 10 cents from last year.
  • The International Monetary Fund has lowered its projections for global economic growth, including in the United States, citing sharp cuts in government spending and the struggling eurozone.
  • Cairo is negotiating with the International Monetary Fund for a $4.8 billion loan to help pull Egypt out of its deep economic crisis. The government subsidizes wheat and fuel but is running out of money to purchase these crucial imports, and Egyptians are feeling the pinch.
  • The IMF says that price of gasoline in the U.S. covers the cost of producing and distribution gasoline but it doesn't reflect the costs that gasoline consumption imposes on society — in the form of traffic, congestion, pollution and global warming. Linda Wertheimer talks to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, about a new IMF report on energy subsidies.
  • International Monetary Fund economists also warn that things could get even worse if European leaders don't finally get the euro crisis under control and if U.S. lawmakers let the federal government go over its "fiscal cliff."
  • The IMF went into this weekend's meetings with a goal of raising enough funds to deal with the European debt crisis. China, Brazil and other countries helped surpass that goal, but there's something they want in return.
  • Member countries have pledged $430 billion to add to the International Monetary Fund's crisis-fighting arsenal. The aim is to amass enough resources to handle any further problems coming from the prolonged debt crisis in Europe, but the funds come with a few caveats.