business

Matt Bloom / KUNC

As he walked through the front door of his new 14,000 square foot lab in Wellington, Emek Blair couldn’t help but remember the Craigslist chair.

In 2015, he and the staff of his nutritional supplement company, Valimenta, were moving into the business’ first office space in Fort Collins. The group was dealing with the onslaught of challenges most startups undergo: Money was tight, space was limited and they needed office supplies.

Stacy Nick / KUNC

Over the years, Edward Victor Dick has seen a lot of highs and lows in the guitar market.

“You know, in the mid-’80s we thought acoustic instruments were going to be complete dinosaurs because people were playing electric instruments and samplers,” said Dick, the owner of Denver’s Victor Guitar. “Then Eric Clapton came out with his ‘Unplugged’ album.

“After 9/11, it was kind of a bit of a strange experience because business just dropped like a stone,” Dick added. “And we all thought the world was gonna end.”

Joan Marcus/Courtesy of DCPA

When general admission seats for “Hamilton” go on sale Jan. 22 at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, a lot of fans will be online taking their shot at tickets. Unfortunately, they won’t be the only ones.

With such a high-demand show, third-party ticket brokers will also eagerly be looking for ways to get their hands on tickets. Lots of tickets. The brokers use online bots to purchase large blocks of tickets and then resell them, often on websites designed to look like they are affiliated with the venue, said John Ekeberg, executive director of DCPA’s Broadway division.

The first tip-off: an exorbitant price tag.

“If it seems too expensive, there’s a good chance that it is,” Ekeberg said.

Courtesy Meow Wolf

It’s official: Meow Wolf Denver will open in 2020.

At 90,000 square feet, the arts collective’s first permanent exhibition outside of its Santa Fe home will be more than three times the size of the original space. Inside, it will continue the group’s style of “maximalist storytelling” through bright and bold installations from local artists.

Matt Bloom

Ten years ago, Bill Conkling worked in quality assurance at Anheuser Busch where he tested batches of beer for a living. Now, he crushes Colorado-grown grapes into more than 12,000 bottles of wine each year.

In 2007 he saw an opportunity to produce wine in Northern Colorado, so he started Ten Bears Winery in Laporte during his spare time. After 8 years of promoting his wine at farmers markets and festivals, he grew the business into his full-time job.