Firestone explosion

Weld County (left photo) and the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (right photo).

Federal investigators released a highly-anticipated summary of the 2017 explosion in Firestone on Tuesday, prompting statements of frustration from the family at the center of the accident and renewed calls for government action to prevent similar tragedies.

Clinton Steeds / Flickr

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper signed an executive order this week requiring that abandoned oil and gas equipment be plugged up or removed. 

The move comes about a year after an old natural gas pipeline leaked methane into a home in Firestone, Colorado. The home exploded, killing two people and injuring another.

Leigh Paterson / KUNC

After a deadly home explosion in Firestone, Colo. last spring, the state is now updating its oil and gas regulations. At a public meeting on Jan. 8, several local officials and residents were focused on one item not on the table: mapping a type of small pipeline called a flowline.

Leigh Paterson / Insider Energy

In Northern Colorado, two massive industries are colliding: home development and energy development. At the intersection of the two are serious and growing concerns about health and safety.

As more drilling rigs and more subdivisions go up in towns across the Front Range, what happens when people and oil and gas become neighbors?

Inside Energy

A home explosion in a Denver suburb in April that has been linked to energy development has left Colorado communities wondering: are we safe? To give some context to that question, Inside Energy and Rocky Mountain PBS has analyzed data relating to spills, fires, explosions, and the inspectors charged with keeping an eye on it all.

Are There Oil And Gas Flowlines In Your Neighborhood?

Jul 18, 2017
KUNC file photo

A one-inch pipeline running just feet below a home in Firestone, Colorado, leaked odorless gas into the basement this spring, causing an explosion that leveled the house. Two people died and another was severely injured.

Google Maps

When a home went up in flames on Twilight Avenue in April, in a subdivision north of Denver, two people died. Now, the investigation into what happened is underway, clean-up is ongoing, lawsuits are being filed and residents who live in that small community are worried — not only about their safety but about the value of their homes. 

YouTube channel Cataclysmic

On the afternoon of April 17th, 10-year-old Gillian Chapman and her little sister Kailey were on their front porch. Gillian had on her roller blades; Kailey had her scooter. They had just gotten permission to go visit their friend Jaelynn, across the street and two doors down.

Then, Jaelynn’s house exploded.

“The house just split open,” Gillian said. “You could see the upstairs.”

Jaelynn Martinez was not in her home at the time, but her father Mark and uncle Joey Irwin were in the basement and were killed in the blast. Her mother, Erin Martinez was injured.