Parked: Half the American Dream

Parked: Half the American Dream is the result of a first-of-its-kind collaboration between more than a dozen Colorado news organizations.

Newspaper, online, radio and wire service journalists fanned out across the state to focus on the evolving landscape for mobile homes — Colorado’s largest source of unsubsidized affordable housing.

Contributors to this project include: The Aspen Times, Associated Press, Aurora Sentinel, Colorado Sun, Colorado Independent, Cortez Journal, Delta County Independent, Durango Herald, Fort Collins Coloradoan, Grand Junction Daily Sentinel, Greeley Tribune, KUNC, Montrose Daily Press, Ouray County Plaindealer and Steamboat Pilot & Today.

Parked: New State Law Brings Hope To Colorado's Mobile-Home Residents

Sep 19, 2019
Westwood
Jeremy Sparig / Special to The Colorado Sun

On a late-August Sunday afternoon, state Rep. Meg Froelich readied the meeting room at the Sheridan Library for a town hall with constituents. There was one item on the agenda: a recently enacted law designed to give mobile-home owners more protections and a way to handle disputes with the managers and park owners who control the land beneath them.

As she tended to cookies and lemonade, the stream of local residents quickly filled a few rows of folding chairs. And they kept coming. Froelich and others scrambled to set up more seats to accommodate a crowd that topped 60 residents from the handful of mobile-home parks in her district.

Parked: Mobile Home Parks Are Immigrants' Home Away From Home

Sep 18, 2019
Resident
Tina Griego / The Colorado Independent

The Aspens Mobile Home Village sits on a wedge of land tucked between eastbound I-70 and the Eagle River in the mountains near Vail. The park is easy to miss in the blur of freeway speeds — trees, a fence, trailers flashing past before the blue sign for Exit 167 zooms into view, advertising Burger King and Subway and Fiesta Jalisco.

Parked: Aurora Struggles To Help Renters In Mobile Home Parks

Sep 17, 2019
Berkeley Village Mobile Home Park
Philip B. Poston / Sentinel Colorado

More than a year ago, Aurora was blazing trails in how to handle the battle between mobile home park owners and helpless renters.

Now, Aurora lawmakers, like so many across the state, are struggling again with whether and how to preserve the dwindling stock of affordable housing.

Brennan Linsley / The Associated Press

When the flood waters in 2013 subsided, tens of thousands of evacuees along Colorado's Front Range returned to see what happened to their homes. One of them was Amanda Anderson.

"All of it was just mud," Anderson said. "It was so dark in there because of the mud. It was like walking into a horror movie because it used to be so bright."

Parked: Half the American Dream: From Mom And Pop To Corporate

Sep 16, 2019
Karla Lyons
Kathryn Scott / Special to The Colorado Sun

In the Aurora mobile home park where she lived for 16 years, eviction notices kept coming to Petra Bennett's door — for unauthorized guests, lack of insurance, late rent. They were bogus threats to make the single mother leave. And eventually, she did.

In Federal Heights, Karla Lyons' waitressing wages are eaten up by a constant stream of home and yard repairs ordered by her park manager, including removal of a giant maple tree that fell on her patio roof and crushed it. She would move if she could afford it.