Scott Horsley

Scott Horsley is a White House correspondent for NPR News. He was a fixture on the campaign trail throughout 2008, traveling extensively with Senator John McCain to cover the Arizona senator's bid for the presidency.

Horsley comes to the White House beat from the west coast, where he covered the economy and energy as NPR's San Diego-based business correspondent. He also helped cover the 2004 presidential campaign, and reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley was a reporter for member station KPBS-FM, where he received numerous honors, including a Public Radio News Directors' award for coverage of the California energy crisis. He also worked as a reporter for WUSF-FM in Tampa, Florida, and as a news writer and reporter for commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. He began his professional career in 1987 as a production assistant for NPR in Washington.

Born and raised in Denver, Colorado, Horsley received a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University.

Pages

10:01pm

Tue August 30, 2011
Politics

Perry Revives Social Security 'Ponzi Scheme' Rhetoric

When Texas Gov. Rick Perry was asked about Social Security during a campaign stop in Ottumwa, Iowa, last weekend, he didn't mince words. He suggested that younger workers who are required to pay into the retirement system are the victims of a government swindle.

"We need to have a conversation with America, just like we're having right here today, and admit that is a Ponzi scheme for these young people," Perry said. "The idea that they're working and paying into Social Security today, the current program, that it's going to be there for them, is a lie."

Read more

10:01pm

Thu August 25, 2011
Economy

As Economy Teeters, All Eyes On Bernanke

Originally published on Fri August 26, 2011 9:41 am

Investors are closely watching Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke's speech Friday in Jackson Hole, Wyo.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Nervous investors will be listening Friday to Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke's remarks in Jackson Hole, Wyo., for clues to additional steps the Fed might take to shore up the sagging economy.

For the past three decades, central bankers, and the people who watch them, have been gathering each summer in the Rocky Mountain resort to do some deep thinking about the economy. Fiscal watchdog Maya MacGuineas, who has attended several of these meetings, says it's not just the view of the Grand Tetons that makes them special.

Read more

3:07pm

Mon August 15, 2011
Politics

Obama Tours Midwest To Talk About Economy

President Obama speaks Monday at the town hall-style meeting at the Lower Hannah's Bend Park in Cannon Falls, Minn. Obama is on a bus tour of Minnesota, Iowa and Illinois where he is scheduled to speak with people about economic issues.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

After a weekend dominated by Republican White House hopefuls, President Obama hit the campaign trail Monday.

The president kicked-off a three-day tour of the Upper Midwest in a specially outfitted bus with plans to visit small towns in Minnesota, Iowa and Illinois, listening to voters' frustration with Washington, and venting some of his own.

Read more

3:37pm

Tue July 26, 2011
Politics

Debt Ceiling Decision Could Hamper Job Growth

Every day Congress spends bickering about the debt ceiling is a day lawmakers aren't tackling other problems. And that includes a sluggish economy that's left millions of Americans out of work.

For some in the current debate, the government's focus on budget deficits is a start toward a better economy. For others, it's a distraction from dealing with the real problems of unemployment. If lawmakers aren't careful, the deficit reduction deal could actually make the jobs picture worse.

Not Able To Focus On Anything Else

Read more

10:01pm

Wed July 20, 2011
Economy

'Chained CPI' Seen As Tactic To Trim Deficit

Inflation doesn't account for the fact that when the price of one fruit goes up, consumers often buy another. Changing the way the government measures inflation would be one way to reduce the deficit.
iStockphoto

The "Gang of Six" bipartisan proposal to end the ongoing debate over raising the federal debt ceiling would include a $500 billion "down payment" on deficit reduction.

A big chunk of that would come from changing the way the government measures inflation.

One of the advocates for the switch is Marc Goldwein, who was a staffer for the president's fiscal commission. He's now a senior policy analyst at the New America Foundation.

Read more

Pages