Iraq

5:42am

Wed January 25, 2012
The Two-Way

Marine Accused In Killing Of 24 Iraqis In Haditha Will Serve No Jail Time

U.S. Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Frank Wuterich (R) walking into court with his defense attorney Neal Puckette for opening statements in the Haditha murders trial at Camp Pendleton on Jan. 9.
Sandy Huffaker AFP/Getty Images

Staff Sgt. Frank Wuterich, who pleaded guilty of dereliction of duty in connection with the killing of 24 unarmed Iraqi civilians in Haditha, apologized during his sentencing hearing yesterday.

The AP reports:

Read more
Tags: 

10:01pm

Wed January 18, 2012
Iraq

After 20 Years, An Iraqi Returns To A Changed Land

After a 20-year absence, Aseel Albanna returned to her native Iraq and found a very different country. Here, she poses with the statue of King Shahryar, a character in The Thousand and One Nights, near the Tigris River in Baghdad. The area used to be extremely popular, but many of the fish restaurants that once lined the streets have been torn down.
Sean Carberry NPR

In September 1991, Aseel Albanna was about to finish her last year of architecture school in Baghdad. Wanting a break from the years of war and hardship, she took a trip to the U.S. But a planned four-week visit turned into a 20-year stay.

Family members in Kentucky arranged for her to complete her architecture degree at the University of Kentucky. She then lived and worked in Louisville until she moved to Washington, D.C., in 2005.

Read more
Tags: 

11:10am

Mon September 12, 2011
The Two-Way

Woodward: It's Clear From His New Book, Cheney Didn't Learn From Iraq

Former Vice President Dick Cheney. (Feb. 10, 2011, file photo.)
Alex Brandon AP

We've been keeping up with reaction to former Vice President Dick Cheney's new memoir, In My Time. In it, the vice president has made some extraordinary claims, including that he was in charge during Sept. 11 and saying that he still supports water boarding as way to get detainees to talk.

Read more
Tags: 

10:01pm

Tue September 6, 2011
Interviews

Baghdad College And America's Shifting Role In Iraq

Originally published on Wed September 7, 2011 1:57 pm

Students play a basketball game on the campus of Iraq's Baghdad College, in this undated photograph.
Ed Ou The New York Times

A school founded by Americans in Iraq before the Saddam Hussein era is an emblem of a time when the United States was known in the Middle East not for military action, but for culture and education. That's the view of Puliter Prize-winning New York Times correspondent Anthony Shadid, who recently wrote an essay about the school, titled "The American Age, Iraq."

Read more

9:00am

Tue August 30, 2011
The Two-Way

Cheney: Iraq War Did Not Hurt Reputation Of U.S.; Was Sound Policy

"Critics here at home" argue that the war in Iraq has hurt the reputation of the United States around the world, former Vice President Dick Cheney acknowledged this morning. But he doesn't believe that's true.

"In fact I think it was sound policy that dealt with a very serious problem" — then-Iraqi leader Sadaam Hussein — Cheney said on NBC-TV's The Today Show.

Read more
Tags: 

Pages