Superstorm Sandy

3:01pm

Tue October 30, 2012
NPR Story

Losses From Sandy Could Reach $50 Billion

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 3:16 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Homeowners, businesses, and insurance companies are still assessing the damage from the storm in much of the eastern U.S. But some early estimates are in.

And as NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports, Hurricane Sandy inflicted heavy economic damage.

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2:01pm

Tue October 30, 2012
Gas Prices

Gas Prices Dropping In Colorado, Sandy Not Expected To Be A Price Factor

Nathan Heffel KUNC

As the East Coast begins to assess the damage left in Hurricane Sandy’s wake, gas prices along the Eastern Seaboard could be affected if there is a disruption in supply.

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1:55pm

Tue October 30, 2012
The Two-Way

Keeping Sandy's Economic Impact In Perspective

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 8:32 am

A truck drives through a flooded street caused by Hurricane Sandy in New York City's Financial District on Tuesday.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

When Superstorm Sandy slammed into the East Coast on Monday, the fragile U.S. economy was just sitting there, stuck in a sluggish-growth mode.

Now, as the massive cleanup begins, business owners, workers and investors are wondering what impact the megastorm ultimately will have on their wallets. Did Sandy weigh down economic activity enough to drown the recovery? Or will the rebuilding efforts boost growth over the longer term?

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1:29pm

Tue October 30, 2012
The Two-Way

Superstorm Shines A Light On Power Grid Vulnerabilities

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 2:09 pm

A street light and utility pole brought down by Hurricane Sandy lay on the street in Avalon, N.J. About 2.5 million customers had no power Tuesday in New Jersey.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

The storm that has spawned so many worst-ever superlatives managed a few more when it comes to electricity, with record-breaking power outages across 18 states stretching from Michigan and Indiana to Maine and North Carolina, according to a Department of Energy assessment.

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1:27pm

Tue October 30, 2012
The Two-Way

Captain's Judgment Questioned After Sinking Of Tall Ship

Originally published on Fri December 14, 2012 10:41 am

The 180-foot sailing vessel Bounty goes down off the North Carolina coast on Monday.
USCG United States Coast Guard

When the HMS Bounty set sail in 1787, Captain William Bligh had only his instincts to safely complete a journey from England to the South Pacific island of Tahiti. Last week, Robin Walbridge, captain of a replica of Bligh's ship of mutiny fame, had every modern weather-forecasting resource to plan a voyage from New London, Conn., to St. Petersburg, Fla.

But it didn't keep him from a fatal misjudgment.

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