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Author Ben Fountain's Book Picks For 2013

Ben Fountain is the author of <a href="http://www.npr.org/books/titles/152675694/billy-lynns-long-halftime-walk">Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk</a> and the short story collection <em>Brief Encounters With Che Guevara</em>.
Thorne Anderson
Ben Fountain is the author of Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk and the short story collection Brief Encounters With Che Guevara.

Last spring, weekends on All Things Considered spoke with author Ben Fountain just as he released his widely acclaimed first novel, Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk. Later in the year, it was nominated for the National Book Award.

We asked Fountain to share with us what he's looking forward to in the book world next year. He says he's read about 25 books for release in 2013 and tells host Jacki Lyden, "The state of American fiction is really strong, at least from where I'm standing."

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