Courtney Dorning | KUNC

Courtney Dorning

Courtney Dorning has been a Senior Editor for NPR's All Things Considered since November 2018. In that role, she's the lead editor for the daily show. Dorning is responsible for newsmaker interviews, lead news segments and the small, quirky features that are a hallmark of the network's flagship afternoon magazine program.

Dorning has been the editor on interviews ranging from former First Lady Michelle Obama, actress and activist Jane Fonda and Speaker of the House. She contributes heavily to All Things Considered's political coverage and has played a key role in the show's coverage of the #MeToo movement. Previously, Dorning was an editor at Morning Edition.

Prior to joining NPR, she spent nearly ten years at ABC News as a researcher and producer. Dorning helped produce town meetings from Israel in 2000 and 2002, and was a key part of Nightline's award-winning coverage of Sept. 11 and the Iraq war.

Dorning lives just outside Washington, D.C., with her husband, three children and a black lab. Having a singleton and twins in 18 months has sharpened the multi-tasking skills and nerves of steel that are essential for editing two hours of daily live programming.

Dorning is a graduate of Saint Mary's College and has a master's degree from Northwestern's Medill School of Journalism.

As the number of COVID-19 deaths continues its upward march, many of the rituals designed to help people navigate the loss of a loved one aren't possible.

Living with the pandemic has been difficult for everyone: the isolation, the need to wear protective gear like masks and gloves, the adjustment to working or learning from home.

For those living with or caring for someone with severe autism, those challenges can be exponentially more difficult.

"Wearing gloves or masks, you know, things like that? That's just not going to happen here," says Feda Almaliti.