Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Mornings from 6 to 9 a.m.
Rachel Martin
Dan Greenwood

On Sundays, Weekend Edition combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. With a nod to traditional Sunday habits, the program offers a fix for diehard crossword addicts-word games and brainteasers with The Puzzlemaster, a.k.a. Will Shortz, puzzle editor of The New York Times. With Hansen on the sidelines, a caller plays the latest word game on the air while listeners compete silently at home. The NPR mailbag is proof that the competition to go head-to-head with Shortz is rather vigorous.

Another trademark of Sunday's program is "Voices in the News," a montage of sound bites from the past week, poignant in its simplicity. Hansen also engages listeners in her discussions with regular contributors, who cover a wide range of national and international issues.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5102dd06e1c8ff994aa73fac|50e742a4e1c8e204c0dcca8a

Pages

6:00am

Sun October 2, 2011
NPR Story

Sen. Durbin Defends Reform Despite New Bank Fees

This past week, Bank of America announced plans to charge most of its debit card users $5 a month if they use the card to make purchases. The decision is meant to offset anticipated revenue losses from regulatory changes that took effect on Friday. Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois introduced those changes to last year's Dodd-Frank financial reform legislation. Durbin joins host Audie Cornish to explain why he thinks the legislation is important.

6:00am

Sun October 2, 2011
Music News

Beethoven's Lost Work No Longer Imaginary

In 1800 Ludwig van Beethoven dumped and re-wrote the whole second movement of his String Quartet in G, Opus 18, No. 2. Most scholars thought the original draft was lost, but a music professor from the University of Manchester has reconstructed what he thinks that first version might have sounded like. Host Audie Cornish talks with violinist Vlad Bogdanas of the Quatuor Danel string quartet, which debuted the piece last week.

12:52am

Sun October 2, 2011
Author Interviews

A Muse Gets Mad In Oyeyemi's Magical 'Mr. Fox'

Novelist Helen Oyeyemi was born in Nigeria and raised in London. Mr. Fox is her fourth book.
Saneesh Sukumaran

In the opening pages of the novel Mr. Fox, we're introduced to St. John Fox — a writer visited by his muse, Mary Foxe. Mary may be real, or she may be imagined, but either way, she's angry.

St. John Fox has been killing off his heroines in story after story and Mary Foxe has had enough. "You're a villain," Foxe tells the 1930s-era English writer. "You kill women. You're a serial killer."

She challenges him to create and live within stories that don't end in death.

Read more

10:01pm

Sat October 1, 2011
Games & Humor

A Supreme Court Order

On-Air Challenge: In honor of the start of the Supreme Court's new term, think of five words related to a given category whose first letters spell out "court." For example, if the category was girls' names, the answers could be (C)onnie, (O)lga, (U)ma, (R)achel and (T)ina.

Read more

10:01pm

Sat October 1, 2011
Monkey See

Ken Burns' 'Prohibition' Recalls A Law So Strict It Was (Tee)totally Doomed

Agents pour out alcohol into the gutter during a raid. Ken Burns' Prohibition airs beginning Sunday night on PBS.
New York Daily News

"We were awash in alcohol in the 19th century," says documentarian Ken Burns in a discussion with Audie Cornish on Weekend Edition Sunday. Burns' Prohibition, beginning Sunday night on PBS, serves as the follow-up to his past series on topics as diverse as the Civil War, Jazz, the National Park system, and baseball.

Read more

Pages