Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday Mornings from 6 to 9 a.m.
Rachel Martin
Dan Greenwood

On Sundays, Weekend Edition combines the news with colorful arts and human-interest features, appealing to the curious and eclectic. With a nod to traditional Sunday habits, the program offers a fix for diehard crossword addicts-word games and brainteasers with The Puzzlemaster, a.k.a. Will Shortz, puzzle editor of The New York Times. With Hansen on the sidelines, a caller plays the latest word game on the air while listeners compete silently at home. The NPR mailbag is proof that the competition to go head-to-head with Shortz is rather vigorous.

Another trademark of Sunday's program is "Voices in the News," a montage of sound bites from the past week, poignant in its simplicity. Hansen also engages listeners in her discussions with regular contributors, who cover a wide range of national and international issues.

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6:15am

Sun July 6, 2014
Games & Humor

If You Cut In The Middle, Go To The End Of The Line

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 10:50 am

NPR

On-air challenge: Two clues will be given for two five-letter answers. Move the middle letter of the first answer to the end of the word to get the second answer. Example: A weapon that's thrown; a tire in the trunk. Answer: spear/spare

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5:55am

Sun July 6, 2014
Music

The Kentucky Sisters And Old-Time Tunes As Doorways To History

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 12:46 pm

The Kentucky Sisters.
Jason Rhein Elephant Quilty Productions

Did you know that John F. Kennedy was a Republican? Neither did I. But that's what one of my college students guessed in a course on news writing. I asked another kid what period followed the Industrial Age and she said, "The Golden Age?" We moved on.

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10:59am

Sun June 29, 2014
Europe

In Paris, Training Wheels For The Littlest Riders

Originally published on Sun June 29, 2014 1:58 pm

Not quite 3 years old, Oscar Bayeda is just learning to ride with the help of P'tit Velib's bike-sharing program for children.
Eleanor Beardsley NPR

A bike rental scheme in Paris that began seven years ago has been such a success, the city has launched a version for children. Parents can now rent bikes for tots up to 8 years old at locations across the city.

Officials say the program won't cost Paris a cent and might help build a new generation of environmentally conscious citizens — or perhaps inspire a few future Tour de France champions.

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10:31am

Sun June 29, 2014
Economy

Housing Market Fake-Outs Stump Economists

Originally published on Sun June 29, 2014 1:13 pm

Homebuilding remains slumped at levels not seen since WWII.
Mike Groll AP

Many homebuyers have been throwing down cold hard cash for their entire house purchase in recent years. Some are baby-boomers who sold a bigger house and are downsizing. Some are investors. Others are from outside the U.S.

"Top of the list in terms of cash sales in the first quarter was Florida, with 64 percent of all sales going to cash buyers, followed by New York, 59 percent; Alabama, 56 percent," says Daren Blomquist, vice president of RealtyTrac, which did a study on cash purchases.

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9:42am

Sun June 29, 2014
Strange News

How 'Professor Godzilla' Learned To Roar

Originally published on Sun June 29, 2014 2:15 pm

For William Tsutsui, incoming president of Hendrix College and author of Godzilla On My Mind, the iconic lizard is an obsession and an inspiration.
Hillsman Jackson

Hendrix College, a small school outside of Little Rock, Ark., is about to get a new president. His name is William Tsutsui, a Princeton-, Oxford-, and Harvard-educated economist, but he's best known for a certain expertise that has landed him the nickname Professor Godzilla.

Tsutsui first heard the infamous roar of the radioactive monster lizard when he was 8 years old, living in the tiny college town of Bryan, Texas.

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