Mars

12:41pm

Thu September 6, 2012
The Two-Way

From Mars: Curiosity's Tracks, Up Close And From Above

Curiosity's tracks on Mars, in an image taken from the rover.
NASA.gov

NASA continues to share some fascinating photos of the Mars rover Curiosity. Among the latest:

-- An image taken from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter that shows Curiosity's tracks from high above. According to NASA, "the image's color has been enhanced to show the surface details better."

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5:10am

Tue August 28, 2012
Around the Nation

Rover Makes History With Beamed Voice Recording

Originally published on Tue August 28, 2012 7:32 am

NASA Rover Curiosity has been making history since it descended onto the surface of the Red Planet. At a news conference Monday, the rover made history again when it broadcast from the surface of Mars. NASA sent a data file of the recording up to the rover, and then beamed it back down.

12:52pm

Wed August 22, 2012
The Two-Way

Curiosity Is On A Roll: Makes Its First Movements On Mars

Those tracks to the top and right were made by Curiosity as it moved today.
NASA

It didn't go far, but the NASA rover Curiosity has taken its first test drive on Mars.

"This is how I roll," NASA writes (speaking for Curiosity) with a photo it has released showing the rover's first tracks. "Forward 3 meters, 90 [degree] turn, then back. Electric slide, anyone?"

"We have a fully functioning mobility system," NASA engineer Matt Heverly just told reporters. He said Curiosity ended up moving about 4 1/2 meters during today's test. It also did a full revolution going forward, backed up and did another revolution.

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2:05pm

Tue August 21, 2012
The Two-Way

Jet Lagged: NASA Engineer And His Family Are Living On Mars Time

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 5:36 pm

David Oh, wife Bryn and his children Braden, 13, Ashlyn, 10, and Devyn, 8, picnic in Santa Monica beach at about 1 a.m.
David Oh

Even the tiniest change — from daylight saving time to standard time — can throw your body off.

Imagine jumping into the time zone of an entirely different planet. That's what the family of David Oh, a NASA engineer, has been doing for weeks.

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1:36pm

Tue August 21, 2012

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