Turkey

9:44am

Sun May 12, 2013
The Two-Way

Turkey Arrests Nine In Investigation Of Deadly Bombings

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 4:01 am

A street is littered with debris on Sunday from one of the Saturday explosions that killed 46 people and injured about 50 others, in Reyhanli, near Turkey's border with Syria.
AP

In Turkey, officials have arrested nine people in connection with what authorities say were two car bombs that killed 46 people near the Syrian border Saturday. Turkish officials say the suspects are Turkish civilians who are loyal to the Syrian regime.

"The bombs exploded in the border town of Reyhanli, which has been a gathering point for refugees, aid workers and smugglers bringing supplies into Syria to aid the effort to oust President Bashar al-Assad's regime," NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Istanbul for our Newscast Desk.

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9:12am

Wed May 8, 2013
The Two-Way

Kurdish Militants Begin Historic Withdrawal From Turkey

Today marks the beginning of the pullback of thousands of militant PKK fighters from Turkey back to Kurdish-controlled northern Iraq. It's an important milestone in a delicate effort to end nearly three decades of bloodshed that have killed an estimated 35,000 people since 1984.

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6:42am

Sun May 5, 2013
World

Foreigners At Home: Turkey Beckons To Germany's Turks

Originally published on Sun May 5, 2013 4:39 pm

The euro crisis and Islamophobia are making Turkey more appealing to the descendants of Turkish immigrants who have been living in Germany.
Julian Finney Getty Images

In 1961, desperate to increase its labor force, West Germany signed an employment agreement with Turkey and launched a wave of immigration that continues to have repercussions today.

Now, after years of being treated as second-class citizens in Europe's economic powerhouse, large numbers of Turks — descendants of the first wave of immigrants — are returning to Turkey.

In A Strange Land

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9:53am

Sat April 27, 2013
The Salt

Don't Call It 'Turkish' Coffee, Unless, Of Course, It Is

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 1:46 pm

Throughout the region that was once the Ottoman empire, people make coffee pretty much the same way: using coffee beans ground into a fine powder, then boiled in a little brass pot that the Turks call a cezve.
maxpax/via Flickr

When I was in Istanbul in March, I stopped by a tiny cafe called Mandabatmaz, near Taksim Square. Ten Bulgarian tourists were inside, waiting for demitasses of rich, strong coffee "so thick even a water buffalo wouldn't sink in it," according to a translation of the cafe's name.

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5:04am

Fri March 29, 2013
Middle East

Syrian Financial Capital's Loss Is Turkey's Gain

Originally published on Fri March 29, 2013 8:20 pm

Syrian refugees are pictured at Kilis refugee camp in Gaziantep, Turkey, on Nov. 1. An estimated 150,000 Syrians are reported to be living in the Turkish border town.
Maurizio Gambarini DPA/Landov

There is a brain drain in Syria, an exodus of the skilled and the educated as the Syrian revolt grinds into a third year.

The health care system is one casualty, as hospitals and clinics are shelled and doctors flee the country.

The business community is another — particularly in Aleppo, Syria's largest city and once the country's industrial and financial hub.

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