Veterans

6:29am

Sat March 29, 2014
StoryCorps

Never Truly Over: Discussing Deployment A Challenge Of Its Own

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 9:27 am

Army Capt. Drew Pham says his wife, Molly Pearl, helps him push through the difficulties of transitioning back to civilian life after deployment in Afghanistan.
StoryCorps

Army Capt. Drew Pham, 26, returned from a tour in Afghanistan in October 2011. Since Drew's been back, it's been hard for him to make sense of what he saw there and adjust to his life at home. It's been difficult for his wife, Molly Pearl, to respond to some of the things he would tell her, too.

Pham called once to tell her he had shot a man. He says she didn't know what to say, so she replied, "Well, we'll deal with it when you get home."

Read more

4:16am

Fri March 7, 2014
The Edge

From War In The Desert To 'Murder Ball On Ice'

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 10:18 am

Former Marine Josh Sweeney lost both of his legs to a bomb in Afghanistan in 2009. He's competing with the U.S. Men's Sled Hockey team at the Paralympics in Sochi.
David Gilkey NPR

It might not exactly be doctor's orders, but it made perfect sense to Josh Sweeney.

"If you hit somebody, you feel a lot better," he says, making his way off the ice from a grueling practice with the U.S. Paralympic Sled Hockey team — a sport also known as "murder ball on ice."

Read more

8:14am

Thu March 6, 2014

NPR/ProPublica Investigates: Grave Science

Lead in text: 
A joint investigation by NPR and ProPublica found the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command’s process of identifying remains is hindered by several layers of bureacracy, an aversion to risk and a reluctance to lead with DNA testing.
Source: Npr
America’s effort to bring home its war dead is slow, inefficient and stymied by outdated methods.

3:49am

Thu March 6, 2014
Author Interviews

Reminder From A Marine: Civilians And Veterans Share Ownership Of War

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 12:47 pm

"Marines and soldiers don't issue themselves orders, they don't send themselves overseas," says former Marine Phil Klay. "United States citizens elect the leaders who send us overseas."

Read more

4:56am

Wed December 11, 2013
Other-Than-Honorable Discharges

Path To Reclaiming Identity Steep For Vets With 'Bad Paper'

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 9:19 am

Michael Hartnett was a Marine during the Gulf War and served in Somalia. He received a bad conduct discharge for abusing drugs and alcohol. His wife, Molly, helped him turn his life around.
Quil Lawrence NPR

When Michael Hartnett was getting kicked out of the U.S. Marine Corps, he was too deep into post-traumatic stress disorder, drugs and alcohol to care as his battalion commander explained to the young man that his career was ending, and ending badly.

"Do you understand what I'm saying to you, son? It's going to be six and a kick," Hartnett recalls the commander telling him.

The "six" was an expected six months of hard labor in the brig. The kick happened at Hartnett's court-martial, and finally woke him up out of the haze.

Read more

Pages