Stacy Nick | KUNC

Stacy Nick

Reporter, Arts and Culture

As KUNC’s arts and culture reporter, I cover everything that brings you joy and sorrow, that makes you feel and opens your mind -- whether it be on a stage, in a gallery or even just a random street corner.

So why art? Because despite personally not being able to carry a tune in a bucket with a handle, I have a deep appreciation for those who do have musical talent, as well as anyone who utilizes the creative process. Being able to communicate through art is powerful and I’ve found that people who follow their passions often have interesting stories to tell.

After graduating from Colorado State University, I started out as an agriculture reporter but eventually found that I preferred the “culture” part. I’ve been covering the arts in Colorado for most of my 20-plus-year career. My first big celebrity interview was Eagles bassist Randy Meisner (and his mom) just before his induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

I have received awards from the Colorado Broadcasters Association, the Society for Professional Journalists, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, the Associated Press, the Colorado Press Association, Colorado Press Women, and the National Federation of Press Women. I have also received two Edward R. Murrow Awards.

When I’m not at work, I’m spending time with my family, taking in some live music or theatre, or trolling the record shops for vintage vinyl as part of my lifelong search for an original pressing of the 1983 “Valley Girl” soundtrack.

Courtesy Colorado Symphony

In this time of social distancing, when your job relies on getting 80 people in the same room, things can be difficult.

“We had a team meeting once we all realized we couldn’t get the ensemble together to perform,” said Tony Pierce, chief artistic officer for the Colorado Symphony. “Because you know, that’s what an orchestra does, we put on live concerts, and when you can’t have audiences or even get the 80 musicians in the Colorado Symphony in one place, we knew we’d have to get creative.”

Courtesy Bob Spillman

In times of distress, a quote from Mr. Rogers often comes up: "When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, 'Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.'"

In a recurring segment, KUNC is collecting stories of local "helpers," people who are going above and beyond to aid others during this time of crisis.

Courtesy of Tami Wolff

In times of distress, a quote from Mr. Rogers often comes up: "When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, 'Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.'”

In a recurring segment, KUNC is collecting stories of local “helpers,” people who are going above and beyond to aid others during this time of crisis.

Courtesy of Nathan Morimitsu

For years, Heidi Hostetter would grab an extra mask to take home from the doctor’s office.

“Little weird but whatever,” joked Hostetter, CEO of Longmont-based H2 Manufacturing Solutions.

Martha Wirth / Courtesy of Amber Blais

A popular meme going around social media right now includes a quote from Mr. Rogers: "When I was a young boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, 'Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.'"

In a new segment, "The Helpers," KUNC is collecting stories of local helpers, people who are going above and beyond to aid others during this time of crisis.

With the need for social distancing, most events are canceled for the foreseeable future and artists ranging from musicians to dancers are losing jobs. That has some looking for creative ways to make ends meet.

Jackie Hai / KUNC

During this unprecedented time, finding coping mechanisms for anxiety, stress and isolation will be critical. You can go for a run, write in a journal — or enjoy some good-natured humor.

That last one can be tough in the midst of a global pandemic, but critical, said Peter McGraw, director of the University of Colorado Boulder's Humor Research Lab, or HuRL.

Photos courtesy of the Denver Art Museum

In its upcoming exhibition, "Natural Forces: Winslow Homer and Frederic Remington," the Denver Art Museum looks at how the two American artists were alike and different. It also focuses on each artist's time as a war correspondent, and how that influenced their later works.

History is full of famous art heists. In 1911, the Mona Lisa was stolen from the Louvre. The Scream was stolen, twice, in 1994 and 2004.

Those works were ultimately recovered, but in some other cases, there's more to the story.

In KUNC's four-part series, "Stolen," arts reporter Stacy Nick looks at an almost 100-year-old mystery in Fort Collins, the time a lifted cartoon of a flatulent unicorn made headlines, the repatriation of Native American artifacts and how a vandalized artwork in Loveland ended up bringing people together.

Courtesy of Kyle Borthick

Updated 2/17/2019 at 11:30 a.m.

Investigators with the Larimer County Sheriff's Office arrested Kevin Dean Eastman, of Greeley, on Feb. 16 in connection with the homicide of Scott Sessions.

Eastman was booked on allegations of first-degree murder and tampering with a deceased human body, along with an outstanding warrant from the Denver Police Department. No additional details are being released at this time.

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