Stacy Nick | KUNC

Stacy Nick

Reporter, Arts and Culture

As KUNC’s arts and culture reporter, I cover everything that brings you joy and sorrow, that makes you feel and opens your mind -- whether it be on a stage, in a gallery or even just a random street corner.

So why art? Because despite personally not being able to carry a tune in a bucket with a handle, I have a deep appreciation for those who do have musical talent, as well as anyone who utilizes the creative process. Being able to communicate through art is powerful and I’ve found that people who follow their passions often have interesting stories to tell.

After graduating from Colorado State University, I started out as an agriculture reporter but eventually found that I preferred the “culture” part. I’ve been covering the arts in Colorado for most of my 20-plus-year career. My first big celebrity interview was Eagles bassist Randy Meisner (and his mom) just before his induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

I have received awards from the Colorado Broadcasters Association, the Society for Professional Journalists, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, the Associated Press, the Colorado Press Association, Colorado Press Women, and the National Federation of Press Women. I have also received two Edward R. Murrow Awards.

When I’m not at work, I’m spending time with my family, taking in some live music or theatre, or trolling the record shops for vintage vinyl as part of my lifelong search for an original pressing of the 1983 “Valley Girl” soundtrack.

Courtesy of The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 1879

On a warm Fort Collins evening, Ann Diaz hands out cardboard boxes to the ladies of The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 1879.

The boxes are filled with copies of the local TALA unit's two-year-long labor of love to write and publish the cookbook, "SerVe: Revisiting A Century of American Legion Auxiliary Cookbooks."

As the title suggests, it's an anthology of 100 years worth of recipes from around the country. But it's not just about food.

Courtesy of DMNS

The exhibit “The Art of the Brick” has traveled to more than 20 countries, 100 cities and six continents, but LEGO artist Nathan Sawaya says he’s always wanted to have an exhibition at its current stop, the Denver Museum of Nature and Science.

“This is the first museum I ever visited,” Sawaya said at a recent press conference. “My grandparents brought me here when I was very, very young. It’s very special to have an exhibition here now.”

Courtesy DMNS

Three months after going dark due to the COVID-19 pandemic, museums in Colorado are beginning to reopen their doors. But like everyone, they're adjusting to the new normal.

On the heels of outdoor cultural venues like the Denver Botanic Gardens and the Denver Zoo opening, indoor venues including History Colorado, the Museo de las Americas and the Denver Museum of Nature and Science announced their reopenings.

Courtesy of Distance Gallery

The phrase “We’re all in this together” has become a bit of a cliché during the COVID-19 pandemic. Everyone is saying it, from politicians to celebrities to car dealerships.

“Unfortunately, when we say, ‘we’re all in this together’ - it’s a nice aphorism but it doesn’t go far enough,” Denver bio-artist Lauri Lynnxe Murphy said.

Leigh Paterson / KUNC

In the midst of protests throughout Downtown Denver, graffiti artist Hiero Veiga added detail to the petals of a rose on the side of a storefront off busy Colfax Avenue. He and muralist Thomas "Detour" Evans are painting a portrait of George Floyd. Two weeks ago, Floyd was killed by a police officer in Minneapolis, sparking outrage across the country.

Against a backdrop that has seen property damaged during protests and police shooting tear gas and rubber bullets, the bright colors making up Floyd's serene gaze alongside the delicate flowers are a kind of respite.

Courtesty Nicole Bartet

In times of distress, a quote from Mr. Rogers often comes up: "When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, 'Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.'"

In its recurring segment, "The Helpers," KUNC is collecting stories of people who are going above and beyond to aid others during this time of crisis.

Public Domain

During the COVID-19 pandemic, masks are having a bit of a moment. They’ve gone from functional to fashionable to controversial, all in the span of about two months. But it’s not the first time fashion has been tied to an epidemic.

KUNC Composite Illustration

Recent Colorado transplants might be in for a surprise this summer: The return of the miller moth.

Common to the state, the pests have been relatively under the radar for the past four years, said Whitney Cranshaw, a professor of entomology and extension specialist at Colorado State University.

Yasunori Koide / CC BY-SA 4.0

As if there wasn't enough to worry about with the COVID-19 pandemic, a new twist to 2020 was recently announced. This time it's the Vespa mandarinia - better known as the Asian giant hornet. The world's largest hornet, it can reach up to two inches long, has a wingspan up to three inches wide and a quarter-inch stinger to inject its venom. 

In times of distress, a quote from Mr. Rogers often comes up: "When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, 'Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.'"

In its recurring segment, "The Helpers," KUNC is collecting stories of people who are going above and beyond to aid others during this time of crisis.

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