White Nose Syndrome

2:52pm

Thu September 20, 2012
Animals

Man-Made Cave Built To Shelter Bats From Infection

Originally published on Thu September 20, 2012 4:05 pm

The artificial cave built for bats in Tennessee has a human entrance below and a bat entrance above. In the summer, any fungus left by the bats over the winter will be cleaned up.
The Nature Conservancy

A man-made bat cave in Tennessee is looking for tenants. An hour northwest of Nashville, the artificial cave is built to give thousands of bats a haven from a devastating infection called white-nose syndrome.

Millions of bats in the Northeast have died from the infection since it first showed up a few years ago. The culprit is an invasive fungus that grows in caves. When bats hibernate inside, they wake up with faces covered in white fuzz and often wind up starving or freezing to death.

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4:11am

Sun August 5, 2012
Animals

Bat Calls Make Eerie Comeback As Techno-Like Beats

Originally published on Wed June 19, 2013 7:04 am

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region Flickr

For the past five years, bats have been disappearing at an alarming rate, falling prey to a mysterious disease called white-nose syndrome. But they're making an eerie comeback in a new audio exhibit at a national park in Vermont. The exhibit features manipulated recordings of bat calls that are funneled through glass vessels hanging from a studio ceiling.

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12:32pm

Thu August 2, 2012
Environment

Closure Decision Upsets Colorado Cavers

Little brown bat with white-nose syndrome in Greeley Mine, Vermont, March 26, 2009.
Marvin Moriarty USFWS

2:48pm

Tue April 17, 2012
Environment

As Deadly Bat Disease Inches West, U.S. Forest Service Weighs Options on Colorado Cave Closures

A U.S. Forest Service worker stands in front of a closed cave in Missouri. This spring the deadly bad disease, White Nose Syndrome, was detected in Missouri, Delaware and Alabama.
USFWS/Ann Froschauer

The U.S. Forest Service says it’s weighing options when it comes to renewing a closure of caves and abandoned mines in Colorado and four other states. The news comes as one environmental group is calling for even more closures in the West to prevent the spread of White Nose Syndrome, which has killed millions of bats on the East Coast.

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1:01pm

Thu April 5, 2012
Animals

White-Nose Syndrome: A Scourge In The Bat Caves

A little brown bat with white-nose syndrome hangs in Greeley Mine, Vt., in March 2009. The disease is spreading across the country, currently affecting bat populations in 19 states.
Marvin Moriarty U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

A disease that has killed more than 5.5 million bats in the eastern United States and Canada is making its way west. White-nose syndrome has now been diagnosed in three Missouri bats — the first confirmed cases west of the Mississippi. And scientists say it won't stop there.

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