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Linton Weeks 2010

Linton Weeks

Linton Weeks joined NPR in the summer of 2008, as its national correspondent for Digital News. He immediately hit the campaign trail, covering the Democratic and Republican National Conventions; fact-checking the debates; and exploring the candidates, the issues and the electorate.

Weeks is originally from Tennessee, and graduated from Rhodes College in 1976. He was the founding editor of Southern Magazine in 1986. The magazine was bought — and crushed — in 1989 by Time-Warner. In 1990, he was named managing editor of The Washington Post's Sunday magazine. Four years later, he became the first director of the newspaper's website, Washingtonpost.com. From 1995 until 2008, he was a staff writer in the Style section of The Washington Post.

He currently lives in a suburb of Washington with the artist Jan Taylor Weeks. In 2009, they created to honor their beloved sons.

  • Guns and America were born around the same time and grew up together. Columbus and other early explorers were probably the first Europeans to bring guns to the New World, archaeologists say. And the arquebus — a long-barreled, musket-like weapon — was most likely the first personal firearm on mainland America.
  • Nothing is enough to ease a parent's pain in losing a child, but simple gestures of kindness and concern are still welcome even in the depths of grief.
  • Post-election pomp and circumstance seem to be in our national DNA, but there have been some low-key inaugurals, including during the Great Depression and World War II. With a looming fiscal cliff, is this the time for a simple swearing-in ceremony on Jan. 21, rather than another megamillion-dollar blowout?
  • "No campaign is perfect," Mitt Romney said on Election Day. "Like any campaign, people can point to mistakes." And so here we are, as the election dust settles, asking seasoned political observers to do just that — point out a handful of foul-ups, fallacies and false steps in Romney's run.
  • A gloomy economy dooms the incumbent? Undecideds break toward the challenger? The tallest guy always wins? Not this time.
  • In an election where we're told every vote counts, a large swath of eligible Americans are not planning to vote early or late or at any time. For myriad reasons — cynicism, apathy, moral objections — some people are choosing to abstain. Here's what they told us.
  • With young people among the hardest hit by the down economy, NPR wondered what millennials want from tonight's debate. The head of a group of college Republicans poses theoretical questions for President Obama. The president of a chapter of college Democrats fashions questions for Mitt Romney.
  • For President Obama and Mitt Romney, voter reaction to their first debate may be less about what they say and more about how they say it (and how they look, sound and gesture). That's what experts in body language, fashion, even makeup said when asked for their unsolicited advice to the candidates.
  • This election year, everybody's getting in on the action. Along with the usual posters, T-shirts and lapel pins, other presidential election tie-ins are popping up across the land. Here are a few of the most unusual political marketing ploys that caught our eye.
  • We've been collecting stories this month about the good things Americans are doing to improve their communities. The project is called Participation Nation, and there is still time for people to get involved.