Telluride

Courtesy of Danny Clinch

Music festival season is officially here and there is no end to the options - whether you like blues, bluegrass or a bite to eat with your bands.

Just beware flying loaves of bread…

Andrew Cooper / SMPSP

When Colorado Film Commissioner Donald Zuckerman hears about new television shows being set in Colorado, he typically doesn’t bat an eye.

He knows that being “set” in Colorado – at least on the small screen – rarely equates to being “filmed” in Colorado. Like the new Chuck Lorre sitcom. The Big Bang Theory creator’s yet-to-be-named new show, along with Parks & Rec star Adam Scott’s new project Buds, will be set in a Colorado marijuana shop.

“They didn’t even call us,” Zuckerman said. “And the reason is, shows like this are done in a studio… They’re set up for it in LA, and they’re set up for it in New York. It’s more cost effective for them to do it there, even if there is a (tax) incentive.”

David Fulmer / Flickr - Creative Commons

"Colorful Colorado" may one day need to be referred to as "Crowded Colorado," given the number of people expected to soon move here.

Weld County's population is expected to double to half-a-million – and El Paso County will still be the largest county. It's not just the Front Range; A Rocky Mountain PBS I-News analysis of data from the state demographer and the U.S. Census Bureau shows seven of the 10 fastest growing counties will be on the Western Slope, including Eagle, Garfield and Routt.

The numbers show an estimated 7.8 million people will call Colorado home by 2040. All that growth will take a toll on the state's infrastructure as well as water and other natural resources.

Pamela Gentile / courtesy of the Telluride Film Festival

Even after 42 years, people who come to The Telluride Film Festival over and over can’t separate the films and the event from the place. Filmmakers introduce their work by raving about the beauty of this setting; festival-goers on the street marvel over the box canyon before they wax ecstatic about a film they’ve just seen.

You can’t avoid it, since it is part of the exquisite dreaminess of the Telluride Film Festival.

STEPHANIE KULBACH

Film festivals add up to more than a list of movies. If it works right, you find yourself in a critical mass of film, conversation, and the sheer intensity of doing nothing else for a few days. Here’s some of what came through at the Telluride and Toronto film festivals.

Jim Hill / KUNC

It's never goes unsaid on stage: Telluride provides one of the best backdrops of any venue anywhere. Every band, whether it's their first trip or not, says it on stage. It happens with such frequency, one cynic in the crowd wondered aloud if there was a stage note telling them to say it.

Now in it's third year, there was a mix of what you could call Ride veterans and Telluride first-timers. All were there to wonder at the scenic beauty and deliver the music to match.

Ken Lund / Flickr

Nearly every school superintendent across Colorado put their name to a letter asking state lawmakers to focus exclusively on restoring budget cuts to school districts and drop bills they’re calling unnecessary.

Doug Anderson / Flickr - Creative Commons

Colorado ski towns are preparing for more than just snow this winter. The first recreational marijuana stores will open in the state in January. While a few communities across Colorado are banning retail stores altogether, others are taking different approaches to the sale of recreational marijuana.

Jim Hill / KUNC

The 'Ride' was back for another year in the Colorado capitol of festivals - Telluride. An all-star lineup greeted those that made it. Didn't make it? We have you covered.

Jim Hill / KUNC

Day two of the Telluride Ride Festival brought new local favorite the Lumineers to the stage. Sets included the Wood Brothers, Jimmy Herring and it was all brought to a spectacular close by Big Head Todd.

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