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10:01am

Wed July 23, 2014
Parallels

As Gaza Fighting Rages, West Bank Palestinians Can Only Watch

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 10:30 am

Palestinian Imad Abudayyah, 49, and his son, Ghassan, 11, speak to relatives in the Gaza Strip via Skype from Ramallah in the West Bank. Israeli restrictions make it extremely difficult to travel between the two territories and West Bank Palestinians have largely been bystanders in the current round of fighting.
Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson NPR

At least three times a day, Imad Abudayyah, 49, fires up his laptop at the West Bank hotel where he's currently living with his 11-year-old son, Ghassan, to reach out to relatives in the Gaza Strip. Abudayyah says Skype is the only way they can see the family members they have left behind.

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9:44am

Wed July 23, 2014
Shots - Health News

States Help New Mothers Get Birth Control Through Medicaid

Intrauterine devices can be used immediately after a woman has given birth to prevent future pregnancies.
iStockphoto

A woman is about to give birth. It will be her second child, and she's not looking to have a third anytime soon. She doesn't want to take birth control pills while she's breast-feeding. And condoms aren't as error-proof as she'd like.

There are a couple of alternatives that are safe, effective and could work for years: an IUD or an implant. She'll need a doctor to get those.

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7:53am

Wed July 23, 2014
The Two-Way

Book News: Booker Prize, Now Open To U.S. Authors, Longlists 5 Americans

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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6:16am

Wed July 23, 2014

5:58am

Wed July 23, 2014
Shots - Health News

Many Kids Who Are Obese Or Overweight Don't Know It

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 9:07 am

Fun hikes offer health benefits for kids of every shape and size.
Annette Birkenfeld annedde/iStockphoto

Kids can be cruel, especially about weight. So you might think overweight or obese children know all too well that they're heavy — thanks to playground politics. But that's not necessarily so, according to government data covering about 6,100 kids and teens ages 8-15.

About 30 percent "misperceived" their weight status (underweight, normal weight, overweight or obese), according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. (The CDC bases those categories on body mass index, adjusted for gender and age.)

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