Doualy Xaykaothao

Doualy Xaykaothao is a reporter and producer, based in Seoul, South Korea, covering breaking news from Asia for NPR News. Her reports can be heard across all NPR News programs.

Xaykaothao joined NPR in 1999 as a production assistant for Morning Edition and has since worked as an NPR producer, editor, director and reporter for NPR's award-winning programs. As a producer for NPR's Newscast Unit, she was a member of the team receiving the 2001 Peabody Award for its coverage of the aftermath of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. From 2003 to 2006, she reported for NPR from Bangkok, Thailand, including coverage of the aftermath of the 2004 tsunami in the Indian Ocean. In 2006, she served as a fellow for the International Reporting Project at Johns Hopkins University-SAIS with a focus on women inside Nepal's 10 year civil war. Xaykaothao was an Annenberg Fellow for NPR Member station KPCC in Los Angeles in 2007, and was part of the reporting team to receive a LA Press Club Award for breaking coverage of the California wildfires. Most recently, she was a producer with NPR's afternoon newsmagazine All Things Considered, until relocating to Seoul in early 2009.

Xaykaothao is Hmong-American, born in Laos, but raised in Texas. She attended Ithaca College and Empire State College in New York, where she specialized in television, radio, political science, and ethnic studies. Her radio career began at Harlem community radio station WHCR 90.3 FM, where she first volunteered as news-reader. Later, at Pacifica Radio's WBAI 99.5 FM, she worked for the station's resident film critic, the late Paul Wunder. At Pacifica, she also coordinated and produced Asia Pacific Forum, a one-hour program about the diverse Asian communities in the United States and abroad.

For those who are curious, Xaykaothao's name is pronounced "dwah-lhee sigh-kow-tao."

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4:48am

Wed January 4, 2012
Asia

N. Korean Kaesong Workers Mourn Kim Jong Il

Originally published on Wed January 4, 2012 10:36 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

Throughout this morning, we're tracking the results of Iowa's Republican presidential caucuses, where Mitt Romney edged Rick Santorum by just eight votes. We're also following other news, including developments from a country that changed its leader with no election at all.

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6:25am

Thu June 23, 2011
Asia

No Trace Of Agent Orange At U.S. Base In South Korea

The U.S. military is investigating claims by veterans that they buried barrels of a toxic defoliant at an American base in South Korea three decades ago. Agent Orange was used during the Vietnam War, and it's been blamed for a variety of ailments, including cancer and nerve disorders.

12:01am

Fri May 27, 2011
Hidden World Of Girls

Family History: The General, His Sisters And Me

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:24 am

Military officials salute the casket of Gen. Vang Pao in Fresno, Calif.
Lianne Milton for NPR

As an American teenager, whenever I asked grown-ups about the Vietnam War, few wanted to discuss it. As an adult, it was just as hard to talk about the war. That's why I never told friends and neighbors about my family's history.

You see, the Vietnam War took place in my family's backyard. My family lived in northeastern Laos, in Nong Het, right on the border with Vietnam. When the CIA needed an ally, they found a charismatic, passionate young man not afraid to die.

That man was my great-uncle, the late Gen. Vang Pao.

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4:58am

Mon March 28, 2011
Asia

Japan Prefab Houses

In one area of Japan, construction crews broke ground to start installing pre-fabricated homes for tens of thousands of displaced tsunami and earthquake victims. The units will be ready to move into by next month.

3:00pm

Sun March 27, 2011
Asia

In Quake-Affected Town, Scenes Of Chaos

Radiation at Japan's troubled nuclear plants is causing new concerns on Sunday. Authorities report that radiation levels in the contaminated water at reactor unit 2 are four times higher than is safe. They have evacuated workers from there. Meanwhile along many coastal communities survivors are struggling with hardship and loss.

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