Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

NPR correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro is most at home when she's on the move. Born in London, the journalist has lived in the United States, Colombia, Afghanistan, Israel and Mexico City. She currently covers the Middle East for NPR, and is based in Jerusalem.

After covering Iraq as NPR News' Baghdad Bureau Chief since February 2008, Garcia-Navarro made another move: relocating to Israel in April 2009 to become NPR's correspondent based in Jerusalem.

Prior to reporting from Baghdad, Garcia-Navarro spent three years as NPR's foreign correspondent in Mexico City, reporting from that region as well as on special assignments abroad. Her depth of reporting brought an insider's cultivated perspective to a territory that also embraces her family's roots (incidentally, her parents are from the region).

Garcia-Navarro got her start in journalism as a freelancer with the BBC World Service and Voice of America, reporting from Cuba, Syria, Panama and Europe. She later became a producer for Associated Press Television News (APTN) before transitioning to AP Radio. While there, Garcia-Navarro covered post-Sept. 11 events in Afghanistan and developments in Jerusalem. From 2002 to 2004, she was based in Iraq.

Why journalism? Garcia-Navarro says that she likes "to tell people's stories, to make their lives real and vivid," adding that it's "an important job and I love doing it."

Garcia-Navarro holds a B.S. in International Relations from Georgetown University and an M.A. in journalism from City University in London. She was the recipient of the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize in 2006 for a two-part series "Migrants' Job Search Empties Mexican Community," and also shared in two awards honoring NPR News' Iraq reporting: a Peabody Award in 2005, and a 2007 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton Award.

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2:19pm

Thu September 18, 2014
Parallels

Could Brazil Have The First 'Green' President Of A Major Economy?

Originally published on Thu September 18, 2014 4:49 pm

Marina Silva, shown here in Rio de Janeiro on Wednesday, is tied in polls with incumbent President Dilma Rousseff. Silva, the candidate for Brazil's Socialist Party, says if elected next month, she would be "the first social environmentalist president."
Silvia Izquierdo AP

Marina Silva, Brazil's former environment minister, tells a story about when she had her environmental awakening. She was young, the daughter of poor rubber tappers, living in an isolated community in the Amazon with seven siblings. Suddenly, building crews showed up outside her door, paving a road in the middle of the forest.

The men didn't only bring a means of transport to the outside world — they also brought a malaria epidemic that killed two of her sisters and two other relatives.

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6:00am

Sat August 9, 2014
Parallels

Letter From Beyond The Grave: A Tale Of Love, Murder And Brazilian Law

Originally published on Sun August 10, 2014 7:23 am

iStockphoto

The story of Lenira de Oliveira and her dead lover's letter is a tale of Brazil. It's a story of love, jealousy, forgiveness, life after death and the criminal court system. And it's true — though it sounds like fiction.

It sounds, in particular, like the work of the late Gabriel Garcia-Marquez.

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5:51am

Sat August 9, 2014
Opinion

An NPR War Correspondent Reflects On A Pet Turning 100 (In Dog Years)

Originally published on Sat August 9, 2014 9:53 am

Lourdes Garcia-Navarro with her husband, James Hider, and their dogs Nena (left) and Ursa.
Tara Todras-Whitehill Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

We think my dog is turning 100 (in dog years) this year. We don't exactly know because Ursa, named after the constellation because she looks like a big golden bear, is a rescue dog.

I was returning home from covering the war in Iraq, and I'd seen the use of so-called therapy dogs on U.S. military bases. The idea is that the soft touch and unconditional love of a pet could help with post-traumatic stress disorder.

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2:01pm

Fri August 1, 2014
Parallels

As Evangelical Clout Grows, Brazil May Face New Culture Wars

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 5:00 pm

Evangelical Christians hold their hands out in prayer during the annual March for Jesus in downtown Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2013. Evangelicals play an increasingly large role in the nation's politics.
Victor R. Caivano AP

Everaldo Dias Pereira — known to his flock as Pastor Everaldo — shakes the hands of potential voters at a shopping mall in a suburb of Sao Paulo in Brazil.

As he wishes them the peace of the Lord, a group of supporters shout out: "Enough of corruption, enough of people who don't know the word of God. We want Pastor Everaldo."

The pastor is running for president, and even though it is unlikely he will win — polls show he only has 3 percent of the vote — his socially conservative message resonates among many of the evangelical faithful.

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2:00pm

Fri July 4, 2014
Latin America

Graffiti Artist Sprays Brazil's Turmoil Across Its City Walls

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 4:27 pm

Paulo Ito's picture of a starving child left to dine on a soccer ball has been shared more than 50,000 times on Facebook.
Andre Penner AP

Brazilian street artist Paulo Ito has captured the spirit of the World Cup with two controversial images: One depicts a starving Brazilian boy with nothing but a soccer ball to eat; the other depicts even protesters watching the games on television. They both speak to viewers worldwide about the costs of staging the mega event. Ito explains what inspired his work and what's happening in Brazil.

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