Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

NPR correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro is most at home when she's on the move. Born in London, the journalist has lived in the United States, Colombia, Afghanistan, Israel and Mexico City. She currently covers the Middle East for NPR, and is based in Jerusalem.

After covering Iraq as NPR News' Baghdad Bureau Chief since February 2008, Garcia-Navarro made another move: relocating to Israel in April 2009 to become NPR's correspondent based in Jerusalem.

Prior to reporting from Baghdad, Garcia-Navarro spent three years as NPR's foreign correspondent in Mexico City, reporting from that region as well as on special assignments abroad. Her depth of reporting brought an insider's cultivated perspective to a territory that also embraces her family's roots (incidentally, her parents are from the region).

Garcia-Navarro got her start in journalism as a freelancer with the BBC World Service and Voice of America, reporting from Cuba, Syria, Panama and Europe. She later became a producer for Associated Press Television News (APTN) before transitioning to AP Radio. While there, Garcia-Navarro covered post-Sept. 11 events in Afghanistan and developments in Jerusalem. From 2002 to 2004, she was based in Iraq.

Why journalism? Garcia-Navarro says that she likes "to tell people's stories, to make their lives real and vivid," adding that it's "an important job and I love doing it."

Garcia-Navarro holds a B.S. in International Relations from Georgetown University and an M.A. in journalism from City University in London. She was the recipient of the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize in 2006 for a two-part series "Migrants' Job Search Empties Mexican Community," and also shared in two awards honoring NPR News' Iraq reporting: a Peabody Award in 2005, and a 2007 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton Award.

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11:03am

Sat February 21, 2015
Latin America

Minor Characters Take The Stage In Argentina's Real-Life Murder Mystery

Originally published on Mon February 23, 2015 1:33 pm

Diego Lagomarsino, a computer expert who gave late prosecutor Alberto Nisman the gun that killed him, speaks to reporters during a press conference in Buenos Aires last month.
Rodrigo Abd AP

The locksmith. The journalist. The computer technician. The waitress. The carpenter.

They are a rotating cast of characters connected to prosecutor Alberto Nisman and the deepening mystery surrounding his death last month. Famous for a moment, they have fed Argentina's obsession with conspiracy.

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3:07pm

Sun February 15, 2015
World

Samba School Outrage Points To Carnival's Murky Financial History

Originally published on Sun February 15, 2015 4:20 pm

Performers from the Beija-Flor samba school parade on a float during Carnival celebrations at the Sambadrome in Rio de Janeiro on March 3, 2014. That year, the Beija-Flor parade was centered on a theme of communication throughout history; this year's theme, underwritten by Equatorial Guinea, is more controversial.
Felipe Dana AP

It's Carnival in Brazil – the five-day wild celebration before the beginning of Lent. And there is no place quite like Rio de Janeiro to enjoy it.

But along with the music, costumes and pageantry comes the inevitable yearly financial scandal.

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2:47pm

Tue February 10, 2015
Parallels

A Historic Drought Grips Brazil's Economic Capital

Originally published on Fri February 13, 2015 4:44 pm

A demonstrator dressed as a bather protests against the rationing of water, outside the official residence of Sao Paulo's Governor Geraldo Alckmin in Sao Paulo, on Jan. 26. The banner behind him reads, "Planet Water, Dry Lives."
Andre Penner AP

Last Sunday, hundreds of Paulistanos, as the residents of Sao Paulo are known, dressed up and danced on the streets at one of the dozens of block parties that happen in advance of the annual celebration known as Carnival.

Except this year – among the pirates and Viking bumblebees — some costumes had a more serious, if still not entirely sober, theme.

Antonio Passareli was dressed as a water fountain — with the spigot placed strategically on his waist. But it's no laughing matter, he said.

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6:01am

Sun February 8, 2015
Parallels

Olympic Golf Course Makes Rio Greener But Turns Some Residents Red

Originally published on Sun February 8, 2015 9:34 am

An aerial view of the Rio 2016 Olympic golf course under construction in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Leo Correa AP

Sitting under the shade of a tree on a hot, cloudless day, a group of young protesters has set up camp across from what will be the golf course for the 2016 Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.

Until recently the area was a kind of informal nature reserve, undeveloped and populated with animals, in a part of the city crowded with gated communities and high-rise buildings.

The group, which calls itself "Occupy Golf," says the massive Olympic golf course has taken away a public area.

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4:19pm

Fri January 30, 2015
Parallels

Argentine Official Says He Sought Cooperation With Iran, Not Cover-Up

Originally published on Sun February 1, 2015 1:35 pm

Argentina's Foreign Minister Hector Timerman on Jan. 15 shows a letter he said was sent in 2013 to Interpol informing it of an agreement reached with Iran's government to investigate the 1994 bombing of the Argentine-Israeli Mutual Association that killed 85 people. Timerman says he met with Iran in an attempt to solve the case and denies accusations he was part of a cover-up.
Rodrigo Abd AP

Shortly before Argentine prosecutor Alberto Nisman was found dead with a bullet in his head, he accused Argentina's president, Cristina Fernandez, and others in her government of covering up what he said was Iran's involvement in the 1994 bombing of a Jewish community center.

Nisman claimed that those involved in the cover-up included Foreign Minister Hector Timerman — a particularly sensitive accusation not only because of his position but because of his background.

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