Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

NPR correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro is most at home when she's on the move. Born in London, the journalist has lived in the United States, Colombia, Afghanistan, Israel and Mexico City. She currently covers the Middle East for NPR, and is based in Jerusalem.

After covering Iraq as NPR News' Baghdad Bureau Chief since February 2008, Garcia-Navarro made another move: relocating to Israel in April 2009 to become NPR's correspondent based in Jerusalem.

Prior to reporting from Baghdad, Garcia-Navarro spent three years as NPR's foreign correspondent in Mexico City, reporting from that region as well as on special assignments abroad. Her depth of reporting brought an insider's cultivated perspective to a territory that also embraces her family's roots (incidentally, her parents are from the region).

Garcia-Navarro got her start in journalism as a freelancer with the BBC World Service and Voice of America, reporting from Cuba, Syria, Panama and Europe. She later became a producer for Associated Press Television News (APTN) before transitioning to AP Radio. While there, Garcia-Navarro covered post-Sept. 11 events in Afghanistan and developments in Jerusalem. From 2002 to 2004, she was based in Iraq.

Why journalism? Garcia-Navarro says that she likes "to tell people's stories, to make their lives real and vivid," adding that it's "an important job and I love doing it."

Garcia-Navarro holds a B.S. in International Relations from Georgetown University and an M.A. in journalism from City University in London. She was the recipient of the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize in 2006 for a two-part series "Migrants' Job Search Empties Mexican Community," and also shared in two awards honoring NPR News' Iraq reporting: a Peabody Award in 2005, and a 2007 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton Award.

Pages

2:00pm

Fri July 4, 2014
Latin America

Graffiti Artist Sprays Brazil's Turmoil Across Its City Walls

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 4:27 pm

Paulo Ito's picture of a starving child left to dine on a soccer ball has been shared more than 50,000 times on Facebook.
Andre Penner AP

Brazilian street artist Paulo Ito has captured the spirit of the World Cup with two controversial images: One depicts a starving Brazilian boy with nothing but a soccer ball to eat; the other depicts even protesters watching the games on television. They both speak to viewers worldwide about the costs of staging the mega event. Ito explains what inspired his work and what's happening in Brazil.

Read more

3:17am

Wed June 18, 2014
Sports

Troubles Put Aside, Brazilians Embrace World Cup

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 5:09 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

We now turn to Brazil and the World Cup. Yesterday, the host country played Mexico, and it was a disappointing performance for home-team fans. It was a draw. Neither side scored. Still, Brazilians are feeling more positive about the World Cup. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports from Sao Paulo.

Read more

2:11pm

Fri June 13, 2014
Sports

How Do You Win A World Cup Game Without Even Playing? Ask A Fan

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 4:23 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, BYLINE: And now a story of superstitions on this Friday the 13, especially for those who have paraskevidekatriophobia - in World Cup action today, Mexico beat Cameroon one nill. The Netherlands beat the defending champions Spain 5 to 1. Yesterday, Brazil won it's match against Croatia 3 to 1. Everybody wants their team to win, and there are many rituals that fans say they use to make that happen. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports now from Sao Paulo.

Read more

4:25am

Fri June 13, 2014
Latin America

World Cup's First Day Marred By Protests

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 7:28 am

Riot police in Sao Paulo used tear gas and stun grenades against protesters angry over Brazil's attention to the World Cup over the needs of its people. The violence came before the first game began.

2:02pm

Thu June 12, 2014
Latin America

Brazilians Greet The World Cup Kickoff With Protests And Tear Gas

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 5:43 pm

In Brazil, thousands of protesters clashed with police just hours before the World Cup opening ceremony. The streets of Sao Paolo were filled with tear gas and concussion grenades.

Pages