Africa

1:58pm

Thu March 8, 2012
Africa

Joseph Kony Is Now A Star — But Will He Be Caught?

Originally published on Thu March 8, 2012 3:35 pm

Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army has been among the world's most brutal rebel forces for a quarter-century. But the Ugandan group received only sporadic international attention before this week, when an Internet video about Kony went viral. Here, Kony is shown in 2006 in southern Sudan.
STR AP

Joseph Kony and the Lord's Resistance Army have been terrorizing civilians in central Africa for more than 25 years. But their crimes have suddenly received prominence due to one of the most successful social media campaigns in history.

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1:10pm

Thu March 8, 2012
The Two-Way

While Controversial, 'Kony 2012' Has Put Focus On Atrocities

Originally published on Thu March 8, 2012 1:17 pm

The leader of the Lord's Resistance Army, Joseph Kony, in 2006.
Stuart Price AP

The arguments continue over the merits of the viral video and Kony 2012 social media blitz that this week have exploded onto the Web.

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12:00pm

Wed March 7, 2012
The Two-Way

Ugandan Warlord Joseph Kony Under Spotlight Thanks To Viral Video

Originally published on Thu March 8, 2012 10:08 am

The leader of the Lord's Resistance Army, Joseph Kony, in 2006.
Stuart Price AP

4:04pm

Mon March 5, 2012
The Two-Way

High Court To Reconsider Major Human Rights Ruling

Originally published on Mon March 5, 2012 4:24 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday that it will hear reargument next term in a major human rights case, raising the specter that the justices might reverse a 2004 ruling that allowed some lawsuits in U.S. courts for human rights atrocities committed abroad.

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10:01pm

Mon February 27, 2012
Law

Human Rights Victims Seek Remedy At High Court

Charles Wiwa fled Nigeria in 1996 following a crackdown on protests against Shell's oil operations in the Niger Delta. Now a resident of Chicago, Wiwa and other natives of the oil-rich Ogoni region are suing Shell for human rights violations.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Human rights are front and center at the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday in two cases testing how American law intersects with international law. At issue in both cases is whether foreign nationals in the United States can sue corporations or other entities in U.S. courts for alleged violations of human rights.

The case that has corporate teeth chattering is a lawsuit against Royal Dutch Shell Oil, which is accused of aiding and abetting the Nigerian government in committing atrocities in the 1990s.

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