John Morse

Tom Sullivan never thought much about guns or gun control — until his son was killed in the Aurora, Colo., movie theater shooting. The gunman wielded a rifle with a 100-round magazine.

Sullivan is convinced that if Colorado's ban on high-capacity magazines had been in effect, his son Alex may have had a chance.

"It was one second, and the next second he was dead," Sullivan says. "That was because of the high-capacity magazines."

John Morse was president of the Colorado Senate until September, when he became the first elected official recalled in the state's history.

Three months later, he's climbing the rotunda steps of the gold-domed Capitol building — his office for seven years. He hasn't been here since October. Gazing up at the dome, he says, "This is one of my favorite things to do. That's my version of smelling the roses."

Morse's political career ended over the gun bills he pushed through these chambers eight months ago. But he says he would do it all again.

Colorado Senate

Senator Evie Hudak (D-Arvada) stepped down Wednesday to avoid a potential recall that could have turned control of the state senate back over to the Republicans.

KUNC / http://coloradosenate.org/home/images

In two historic recall efforts, Democratic State Senators John Morse and Angela Giron lost their seats in the State Legislature Tuesday evening.

Two prominent Democratic state senators could lose their jobs after lawmakers passed sweeping gun control laws following the theater shooting in Auro, Colo., and the Newtown school shooting in Connecticut. Gun rights activists collected enough signatures to force the historic recall elections.

The recalls follow a combative and bitter legislative session. Among the most controversial measures passed were universal background checks and limiting high-capacity magazines to 15 rounds.

Colorado State Senate

A drawn-out fight is almost over for two Colorado lawmakers who are fighting to keep their jobs after voting for new firearms restrictions.

Colorado State Senate

On Sept. 10, voters in Colorado Springs and Pueblo will decide whether two Democratic state senators, John Morse and Angela Giron, should keep their jobs. Both sides of the gun debate in Colorado are pouring a lot of resources into the historic recall elections.

Bente Birkeland / RMCR

Normally, it’s a low time of year in Colorado politics. No general election, no Governor’s race. The state capitol is quiet and the hustle and bustle of the legislative session is long gone.

KUNC

September 10th will be a make or break day for two Colorado lawmakers facing recall.

John Morse isn't bogged down in personal scandal. The Democratic president of the Colorado Senate isn't accused of ethical improprieties or anything else that might directly violate his oath of office.

But by pushing a sweeping gun-control measure he's alienated a swath of voters who are determined to toss him out of office before his term ends.

On Monday, groups opposing restrictions on guns turned in twice as many signatures as they needed to trigger a recall election against Morse. A recall of another state senator appears likely.