Colorado Edition: See What Sticks

Sep 25, 2019

Today on Colorado Edition: We explore how two Northern Colorado cities, Boulder and Fort Collins, are grappling with climate change policy. We also take you to Steamboat Springs to explore the state of housing in the mountain community. Plus, we take a look at a series of proposed measures that could affect the future of business in Boulder, and find out what it takes to build a device that launches pumpkins farther than the rest.

News Of The Day:

  • Endangered Species Act Lawsuit - Colorado has joined a multi-state lawsuit targeting the Interior Department's decision to roll back certain protections in the Endangered Species Act. Under the new rules from the Trump administration, the federal government will be allowed to reduce the amount of land set aside for wildlife and disregard the possible effects of climate change when predicting future dangers to animals. Colorado joins 16 other states and the District of Columbia in the lawsuit.
     
  • Kaiser Permanente Strike - Kaiser Permanente workers in Colorado and across the country will likely stay on the job after reaching a tentative contract agreement. The union representing just over 3,000 employees in Colorado had voted for a nationwide strike starting next month. Kaiser Permanente said in a statement the four-year contract would include yearly raises and continued healthcare and retirement benefits. The union says the agreement would also protect against outsourcing of certain jobs.
     
  • Crestone Peak Resources Lawsuit - Boulder County is not giving up on its lawsuit against oil and gas company Crestone Peak Resources. A district court judge dismissed the case earlier this week, but the county says it will appeal. The suit claims the company doesn't own mineral rights just north of Erie, where it wants to drill one hundred and forty new wells.

Climate Change Concerns In Boulder And Fort Collins

The United Nations Climate Action Summit took place earlier this week in New York. During the summit, countries from around the world met to discuss climate change. But it’s not only nations who are looking toward solutions. We’re also seeing cities and towns – including here in Colorado — taking action. 

In July, the City of Boulder declared a climate emergency. And in August, Fort Collins reaffirmed their commitment to climate action. To learn how each city is approaching the issue, we spoke with Carolyn Elam, energy manager with the Department of Climate Initiatives for the city of Boulder, and Lindsay Ex, the climate program manager for the city of Fort Collins.

Growing Pains: Steamboat Springs - Part 3

The Yampa Valley Housing Authority’s newest build in Steamboat Springs will add 72 rental units near downtown. A previous project built three years ago has a waitlist of 240 households.
Credit JACKIE HAI / KUNC

Homes are expensive in Steamboat Springs. A low-end, single family home will set you back about $600,000, while other properties can cost $1 million or more.  Those prices can turn the dream of home ownership into a nightmare for most low- and middle-income residents.  KUNC's Kyra Buckley takes us there with more on the story. Listen again, or go deeper into Kyra's reporting here.

We also spoke with Eleanor Hasenbeck, who has been reporting on housing in Routt County for the Steamboat Pilot and Today. You can find her story here.

Business Measures In Boulder

Credit Ken Lund / CC BY-SA 2.0

The City of Boulder, like other communities along the Front Range, is trying to find the right balance between jobs and housing. And in the coming weeks, city council is considering a measure that would limit the number of office spaces allowed in certain buildings, in order to increase the amount of housing available in the city. It's the type of decision that could have an impact far beyond Boulder, and to learn more about what it could mean for Boulder and businesses, we spoke with Chris Wood, editor of BizWest.

Punkin' Chunkin' Iin Aurora

Credit STACY NICK / KUNC

What does it take to launch a pumpkin farther than the rest? And what makes someone want to create an elaborate and often expensive machine just to see how far they can launch the festive gourd? KUNC's Stacy Nick met up with a unique group to find out. You can learn more, and see all the photos, here.

Colorado Edition is made possible with support from our KUNC members. Thank you!

Our theme music was composed by Colorado musicians Briana Harris and Johnny Burroughs. Other music this week by Blue Dot Sessions:

  • "Turning On The Lights" by Speakeasy
  • "Horizon Liner" by the Pine Barrenns
  • "Molly Molly" by Barstool
  • "Great Great Lengths" by The Balloonist

Colorado Edition is hosted by Erin O'Toole (@ErinOtoole1) and Henry Zimmerman (@HWZimmerman), and produced by Lily Tyson. The web was edited by digital editor Jackie Hai. News director Catherine Welch and managing editor Brian Larson contributed to this episode.

KUNC's Colorado Edition is a daily news magazine taking an in-depth look at the issues and culture of Northern Colorado. It's available on our website, as well as on iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. You can hear the show on KUNC's air, Monday through Thursday at 6:30 p.m.