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Neil Armstrong

  • Armstrong was remembered at the Washington National Cathedral by regular folks and dignitaries.
  • Before Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, he had to solve a more prosaic problem.
  • "I am, and will ever be, a white-socks, pocket protector, nerdy engineer, born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace and propelled by compressible flow," Neil Armstrong said in 2000.
  • Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon, died over the weekend at the age of 82. Steve Inskeep talks to Neil Degrasse Tyson, director of the Hayden Planetarium in New York, about Armstrong's impact on space exploration.
  • The Apollo 11 moonwalkers were to be remembered as "epic men of flesh and blood" had disaster stranded them on the moon.
  • Neil Armstrong, who became the first man on the moon, is remembered not just for his historic walk, but also his sense of humor and humility. Fellow astronaut Rusty Schweickart says Armstrong will also be remembered as "a symbol of what humanity can do when it sets its mind to it."
  • Armstrong commanded the Apollo 11 spacecraft that landed on the moon July 20, 1969. His words about "one giant leap for mankind" became the stuff of history and were sealed forever in the memory of those who were lucky enough to hear them. The moonwalk was the climax of the U.S.-Soviet space race. He was 82.
  • James Fallows of The Atlantic met Neil Armstrong at a gathering of some of America's greatest aviators and astronauts, and even in that crowd, Armstrong stood out. Saturday, the astronaut's family announced he had died at the age of 82. Guest host Laura Sullivan speaks with Fallows about Armstrong's legacy.
  • Astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon, is dead at the age of 82. He was the first of just 12 Americans to step on the moon from 1969 to 1972. Guest host Laura Sullivan speaks with science journalist Andrew Chaikin, who knew Armstrong and wrote about his contributions to the space program.