Emerald Ash Borer

Bonnie Prushnok
Matt Bloom / KUNC

In the spring of 2016, Bonnie Prushnok noticed a dying tree in the neighborhood across the street from her condo. It had a strange appearance, she said, like it was gasping for life.

Its branches on top were bare, as if dormant for winter. But the lower branches looked full and healthy. A few months later, dozens of mature ash trees in her neighborhood, Reynolds Farm in Longmont, took on a similar characteristic.

"Branches would just break off," said Prushnok, vice president of the Reynolds Farm Homeowners Association. "That was the beginning."

Susan Greenhouse / California Department of Fish and Game

Colorado Forest experts confirmed they found the emerald ash borer in Westminster. This case is the second time the tree-killing beetle has been found outside of quarantine in Boulder County. The first confirmation was last month in Broomfield.

Will Parson/Chesapeake Bay Program / CC BY-NC 2.0

It was the call Tom Wells had been dreading for years.

Earlier this summer, a Broomfield resident discovered a small, dead bug lying on the sidewalk outside of their home. They scooped the carcass up in an envelope and brought it to Wells, the city and county forester, at the public works department.

Therese Glowacki / Boulder County

Wood infested with an invasive beetle is being used to heat some Boulder County buildings, including the jail.

The Emerald Ash Borer has been in Colorado for years now, but remained undetected until 2013, when it was found in the city of Boulder. So far, it’s the furthest point west that EAB has been detected, prompting a quarantine to keep Ash wood from leaving the county. No one has been able to stop or eradicate the EAB.

Colorado State Forest Service

If you've seen a green ribbon around a tree in the communities surrounding the Boulder area, you've been warned. Those ash trees may not survive an invasive little beetle. As part of the National Emerald Ash Borer awareness week, ribboned trees are meant to remind people just how many ash trees could be lost in Front Range communities.

"We estimate that there are over 3 million ash trees in our area," said Laura Pottorff, head of the EAB response team for Colorado. "And that's roughly 15 to 20 percent of our urban forest canopy that is susceptible to Emerald Ash Borer."

The Emerald Ash Borer remained undetected until 2013 when it was found in the city of Boulder, the furthest point west that it has been detected. The invasive beetle is native to Asia and has decimated the ash tree population across the U.S.

Colorado State Forest Service

As spring weather gets warmer and plants start to bloom, it’s also the time for insects living within Colorado trees to awaken and emerge. One of these in particular, the invasive, tree-killing emerald ash borer is especially concerning to foresters since the insect’s target – the ash tree – is widespread along the Front Range.

Because the pest can go virtually undetected for the first few years of an infestation, forest authorities want the public’s help in containing the spread.

www.emeraldashborer.info

Work is underway to remove 800 ash trees from Loveland parks and open spaces. Why? Because of one little beetle.

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been in Colorado for years now, but remained undetected until 2013 when it was found in the city of Boulder, the furthest point west that it has been detected. The invasive beetle is native to Asia and has decimated the ash tree population across the U.S. No one has been able to stop or eradicate it.

Colorado Deptartment of Agriculture / APHIS

Agriculture officials are introducing stingless, parasitic wasps from Asia in an effort to control another non-native insect – the Emerald Ash Borer.

The tiny wasps (Tetrastichus Planipennisi) are a natural parasite of the invasive beetle, native to Asia,that has decimated the ash tree population across the U.S. EAB was found in the city of Boulder in 2013, the furthest west it has yet been found.

Colorado Department of Agriculture

The Emerald Ash Borer, an invasive Asian beetle that has decimated American ash trees in the United States has been in the city of Boulder between three and four years according to the results of a new study conducted by a collaborative EAB incident command team.