6:47am

Sat June 1, 2013
Garden Report

Early June Gardening

This mower may be old fashioned, but it gets the job done.
Credit Halley/Flickr / Wikimedia

 Now is a great time to get some work done in the garden before the summer heat sets in.

KUNC's Gardener Tom Throgmorton offers these suggestions when it comes to prioritizing your work in the garden.

Pruning

Prune flowering shrubs after they bloom in order to avoid cutting off all the flower buds. 

Work with the natural shape of the plant - little, round buns are cute but not necessarily in the best interest of the plant. If it’s a tall, upright plant, prune it tall and upright. Prune hedges so the top is narrower than the bottom so that light reaches down to the base and keeps the hedge denser.

Prune broken or damaged branches in trees - branches broken by the wind or late snows should be taken down to the nearest branch crotch. If the tree is big or beyond your grasp hire a professional. 

Planting

Plant annual flowers - annuals are the workhorses that bloom until they freeze next fall.  Annuals are awesome in containers.  Use trailing plants in hanging baskets.  Try some different stuff like purple basil, other herbs or veggies to accents your containers.  Containers can be moved in out of the weather (frost, hail and wind).

Gardener's tip: Annuals are showiest in masses.  Use them liberally.  You’ll be glad you did.

Plant vegetables - vegetables can go in the ground anytime.  Beans and corn like it warm so make sure to plant them in a sunny, warm spot.  Plant tomatoes in rich soil.  Tomatoes are fast growers, put cages on them early.  We do our peppers in containers.  That way we can put them in a warm, protected spot. 

Lawn Care

Mowing, trimming, dandelions and watering are lawn work.  Keep bluegrass, that’s what most of us have, at least two and one half inches long.  It uses less water and is better for the grass. 

Mow regularly so you cut only one third of the length of the grass blade every time you mow.  Water thoroughly so the water penetrates deeply into the soil.  Deeper watering means less frequent watering. 

When all of the pruning, planting and mowing is done invite a few neighbors over.  Sit back and enjoy the wonderful beauty.

tom@throgmortonplantmanagement.com                     

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