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'Pets,' 'Pizza' & 'Porn' Among New Internet Domain Names Sought

The much-anticipated list of Internet domain names that might soon join such familiar suffixes as .com, .edu and .gov is now online.

As expected, the nearly 2,000 suffixes that have been requested include some from companies who think they can help brand themselves with web addresses that end with things such as:

-- .apple

-- .bananarepublic

-- .chevy

-- .google

-- .lamborghini

Also as expected, there are those that entrepreneurs hope will be cash cows, including:

-- .porn

-- .pets

-- .pizza

And, of course: .sex.

As we've previously reported, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), is looking to expand the list of domain names so that just about any word in any language could become part of web addresses.

But, it's aiming to do it in an orderly fashion. The Associated Press writes that:

"The public can now comment on the proposals. Someone can claim a trademark violation or argue that a proposed suffix is offensive.

"It'll take at least a year or two for ICANN to approve the first of these new suffixes. ICANN will review each proposal to make sure that its financial plan is sound and that contingencies exist in case a company goes out of business. Bidders also must pass criminal background checks.

"Companies and groups had to pay $185,000 per proposal."

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Mark Memmott is NPR's supervising senior editor for Standards & Practices. In that role, he's a resource for NPR's journalists – helping them raise the right questions as they do their work and uphold the organization's standards.
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